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Run to the Top Podcast | The Ultimate Guide to Running

Running podcast to motivate & help runners of every level run their best. interviews running influencers, scientists, psychologists, nutritionists, & everyday runners with inspiring stories.
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Run to the Top Podcast | The Ultimate Guide to Running
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Now displaying: 2017
Dec 13, 2017

He’s back! World renowned dietitian and exercise physiologist Bob Seebohar joins us again to delve deeper into the growing research surrounding his two concepts of metabolic efficiency training (MET) and nutrition periodization.

If you listened to Bob’s last interview with us, you know that together these concepts increase the body's ability to use fat as fuel during exercise and thus optimize both body composition and performance - a hard balance to strike for most distance runners.

If you missed that episode and like what you hear today, be sure to go back and give it a listen here for some better context.

Bob is a registered dietitian, exercise physiologist, NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist, USA Triathlon Level III Elite Coach. He also traveled to the 2008 Summer Olympic Games as a sport dietitian for the US Olympic Team and the personal sport dietitian/exercise physiologist for the Olympic Triathlon Team.

This time Bob’s back to answer YOUR questions and, in so doing, discuss everything from MET’s relationship with paleo and plant-based diets all the way to how you can go about determining your own metabolic efficiency.

Questions Bob is asked:

4:08 What do you do?

6:10 Can you remind us again about your concepts of Nutrition Periodization and Metabolic Efficiency Training?

10:21 Can you describe intuitive eating and how you help athletes attain that in combination with Metabolic Efficiency Training?

14:00 Can you describe what the Crossover Concept is?

23:41 How does the Metabolic Efficiency Test work?

28:20 Listener question from Yusef: Will I keep burning 60% fat at HR 150 bpm, at hour 28 of a 100miler?

39:55 Listener question from Diana: As someone who eats a ton of almond and peanut butter. Is this a carb, a fat or a protein?

48:14 Listener question from Chelsea: How does being vegan affect my metabolic efficiency and are there any tips for how can I improve this without giving up my lifestyle?

54:04 How do the Paleo Diet and High Fat / Low Carb diets fit in with Metabolic Efficiency Training?

57:13  Is it correct to assume you should increase carbs when in the thick of marathon training?

58:45 Listener question from Darlene: Is the Metabolic Efficiency lifestyle suitable for people with type 1 diabetes who use insulin pumps?

1:02:05 You offer personal consultations - what all do these entail and how can people work with you?

1:04:45 Where can listeners get a Metabolic Efficiency Test done?

Quotes by Bob:

“Nutrition periodization is basically aligning your daily nutrition to support your physical training needs.”

“Metabolic efficiency is basically how efficient your body is at using its stores of carbohydrate and fat. Those are the two main stores of energy we have in our body, and you can actually train that.”

“The point where the body crosses from higher to lower fat burning and lower to higher carbohydrate burning - where those two macronutrients cross - is the ‘crossover point’, and in research, they found that to be between 63-65% of max intensity.”

“Metabolic efficiency is a great lifestyle nutrition program no matter what distance you’re training for.”

“It will be more difficult - not impossible, certainly - but it will be more difficult to balance blood sugar following a pure vegan diet than it will when you enter animal proteins, and it’s just because you’re having more carbohydrate than protein.”

 

Want more awesome interviews and advice? Subscribe to our iTunes channel

 

Mentioned in this podcast:

Book: Nutrition Periodization for Athletes: Taking Traditional Sports Nutrition to the Next Level

Bob's Author page on Amazon.com

BobSeebohar.com

eNRG performance homepage

Bob's eNRG performance Coaching Page

Email Sinead

Dec 6, 2017

Our guest this week is an incredible guitar player, amazing singer song-writer, and the best audio editor you could ask for, and I’m not just saying all that because he’ll be reading this while he edits the show. :)

 

If you haven’t already guessed, this week’s guest is none other than Run to the Top editor, Jeremy Noessel.

 

In addition to playing in 3 bands in the Rhode Island / Connecticut / Massachusetts area and working on several podcasts, Jeremy and his wife, Louise, are also writing an e-book for guitarists and musicians, will be soon launching a blog, and also planning his own podcast.

 

I’ve been wanting to have Jeremy on the show for some time now because his story is seriously one of a kind.

 

Jeremy started editing the podcast back when Tina Muir was hosting the show, and since then he’s not only helped us take the show to a whole new level, but the podcast has inspired him to start running again after about a 25-year hiatus.

 

Jeremy’s skill and incredible attention to detail is a large part of the reason Run to the Top is where it is today as Jeremy has not only improved the show’s audio quality tenfold, but, through constant guidance and constructive feedback, he’s also helped me become a better, more confident podcaster.

 

He is a true pleasure to work with, and I’m so excited to have him on the show today to share a little behind-the-scenes look at what goes into making Run to the Top, how the show inspired him to pick up running again, and the lessons he’s gained from editing both Run To The Top and our daily podcast, Extra Kick.

 

Questions Jeremy is asked:

4:43 What do you do with Run to the Top, when and how did you start?

6:25 What’s your favorite part about editing Run to the Top?

9:33 How did editing the podcasts lead to your return to running?

17:57 How did your first race go and how did you feel afterwards?

22:12 What are some of the mistakes you might have made if you started running without the podcasts?

26:30 Do you have any desire for future races, maybe the marathon?

30:19 How has the Run/Walk method helped you get back into running?

34:58 What other Run to the Top episodes you’ve worked on that have resonated with you and helped you?

38:29 What stood out to you in the Kelly Roberts interview?

41:43 How do you balance running with all of your bands and audio work?

43:20 How long does each podcast take you to edit and what’s involved?

48:40 Did you struggle at all when you first started running to juggle everything?

50:54 Where can listeners check out some of your videos, songs and available services?

52:54 Is making music what you enjoy the most?

53:18 Where do your bands play?

 

Quotes by Jeremy:

“I’ve had the benefit of having all of this information that I’ve gotten from the podcasts to avoid some of the common beginners’ pitfalls.”

“On the starting line I kept repeating to myself: 1. Have fun, 2. Don’t get hurt, 3. Start slow.”

“There was a point in time where I didn’t think I would ever NOT Run/Walk.”

“I have had really no formal instruction AT ALL; no formal coaching, so take anything I say with a grain of salt.”

“Running can’t be your everything. And really, nothing should be your everything.”

 

Mentioned in this podcast:

Run to the Top Interview with Jeff Galloway

Book: Getting Started - Jeff Galloway

Jeff Galloway Easy 5k App

Mews Tavern Gear N Beer - 2017

2018 Blessing of the Fleet 10-mile road race

Run to the Top Interview with Danny Dreyer

Run to the Top Interview with Kelly Roberts

The Running For Real Podcast with Tina Muir

Follow Jeremy's running journals on Strava

Jeremy's bands and upcoming events

Jeremy Noessel Music & Audio homepage

Jeremy's Music and Audio Facebook page

Follow 610 Supertanker on Facebook

Listen to 610 Supertanker on ReverbNation

Follow Rhythm & Thunder on Facebook

Rhythm & Thunder's ReverbNation page

Follow Transmission on Facebook

Transmission's ReverbNation page


Nov 29, 2017

Michael Hammond is a graduate of Virginia Tech where he competed in cross country and track, earning two ACC titles and four NCAA All-American honors. His individual efforts led his team to four ACC team championships: one in cross country, two in indoor track, and one in outdoor track.

On this episode, Michael shares his perspective on, well… perspective.

Most runners are goal-focused, which is understandable considering the time and effort that goes into distance running.

But at what point does this single-mindedness become unhealthy? How can runners strike a balance between their running goals and the rest of the world, especially when blindsided by an illness or injury?

In his role as Director of Coaching for RunnersConnect, Michael has gotten to know every member, their motivations and exactly what support they need to receive from the coaches as well as from each other.

In this episode, he’ll also share a little about the support we need to give ourselves.

 

Questions Michael is asked:

3:57 What do you do at RunnersConnect?

5:16  What are some of the biggest mistakes runners make when it comes to longevity and mental health in the sport?

8:46 How can overemphasizing one performance be counterproductive?

14:14 How can runners achieve and maintain a positive mindset?

18:55 What other outlets did you have to balance out running?

25:32 How did you cope with injuries and take your mind off running when you weren’t able to go for a run?

32:15 Why is the ‘comparison trap’ so detrimental for runners?

38:23 What other tips do you have for runners to keep perspective and achieve longevity in the sport?

47:13 What’s on tap for you now that you’re on hiatus from running?

Quotes by Michael:

“I think you should really be running for your own reasons and for yourself.”

“A huge part of staying positive is putting things in perspective from a LIFE standpoint, not just a running standpoint.”

“Injuries will show you what your real priorities are.”

“I think it’s best for 99% of runners to completely ignore professional runners.”

“Some of the most proud feelings I ever had were when I was by myself, completely alone, after a great race and I just felt that tremendous sense of pride and accomplishment; that is what you should be training for.”

“If you’re 50 years old, you can’t compare yourself to when you were 25; it’s not fair to yourself.”

 

We really hope you’ve enjoyed this episode of Run to the Top.

The best way you can show your support of the show is to share this podcast with your family and friends and share it on your Facebook, Twitter, or any other social media channel you use.

If more people who know about the podcast and download the episodes, it means I can reach out to and get through to the top running influencers, to bring them on and share their advice, which hopefully makes the show even more enjoyable for you!

Nov 22, 2017

Telling people that you run marathons usually prompts some dumbfounded expressions, but tell them you run ultras and, let’s face it, they’ll probably think you’re nuts. But that’s just a day in the life for Georgia native, Nathan Maxwell.

 

Like a lot of runners, Nathan started running to get in shape. He did a few 5K’s and then decided to try his hand at the half marathon. That was in 2012.

 

Since then, Nathan has completed 44 ultra marathons, 9 marathons, and 3 100 milers. He’s a self-proclaimed ultra junkie, and he loves sharing his adventures and promoting an active lifestyle on his blog and Twitter account under the name Social Shark.

 

On this episode, Nathan will share with us a little about his journey, how to transition from the marathon to ultras if you’re so inclined, and how to stoke the fire if you feel your passion for running starting to fizzle.

 

While running an ultra is no easy feat, it is manageable and possesses some surprisingly accessible entry points for those who want to dip their running toes in gently.

 

Questions Nathan is asked:

3:22 Can you tell us a little about yourself and what you do?

4:39 Where in South Carolina are you?

5:30 When and how did you get into running?

7:42 Was it love at first sight with ultra running?

10:33 How was the transition into ultra distance?

13:24 How do you train for ultras?

15:37 How do you avoid injury and fatigue with such a rigorous race schedule?

18:57 How can runners be more conscious of how to tune into what their body is telling them?

21:03 What advice do you have for runners who are struggling mentally with their training?

24:19 What advice would you give our listeners aspiring to transition from marathons to ultras?

29:00 How do you break down a 50-mile race in your head when considering race strategy?

34:27 How do you push past hitting the wall in a long race?

37:55 Your favorite mantra (which sits at the top of your website) is “When you walk, you won’t be held back; when you run, you won’t stumble” (Proverbs 4:12 NLT). Can you tell us a little about this and why this is significant to you?

39:53 How did you come by the name Social Shark?

41:42 What did you set out to accomplish with your blog?

43:46 What would you consider to be your proudest achievement to date?

46:13 How did the Uwharrie 100 Miler go?

49:33 What’s next? Any big races on the horizon?

 

Quotes by Nathan:

 

“My weekly mileage isn’t quite as high as even typical marathon runners.”

 

“I really listen to my body and make sure I’m doing the right thing.”

 

“You can set smaller goals (like) ‘I’m gonna run a certain amount of miles in the next 30 days’”

 

“You’re not gonna run the same pace in a half-marathon that you would in a marathon. Just do the same thing as you move up to some type of ultra distance. Expect that you’re going to run slower.”

 

“Find an ultra that’s out there that’s a 6-hour ultra. The nice thing about those events is that they’re very relaxed very chill.”

 

“Being able to be mentally prepared and ahead of time saying, ‘I’m going out and doing this thing.’ It would be so much harder if you were going out there to only run 20 miles and then you got to the 20 mile mark and somebody said, ‘Just kidding! We’re actually doing FORTY today.’ That’s where, mentally, you’re going to be completely devastated and not be able to get through it.”

 

 

Mentioned in this podcast:

Nathan Maxwell - Social Shark Homepage and Blog

P90X Fitness Program

Ultra signup website

Uwharrie 100 Miler

Nutcracker 12-hour ultra NC

Follow Nathan on Twitter

Follow Nathan on Instagram

Nov 15, 2017
  1. The world's best are gritty.
  2. The world's best are clear on their purpose.
  3. The world's best become a master of their thoughts.
  4. The world's best know themselves to master yourself.
  5. The world's best dominate the controllables.
  6. The world's best own the moment.
  7. The world's best choose empowering emotions.
  8. The world's best own who they are.
  9. The world's best live and let go.
  10. The world's best choose their courage zone.

 

In her more than sixteen years coaching elite runners, Olympians, championship teams, executives, and entrepreneurs, world renowned performance psychologist Dr. Cindra Kamphoff has discovered these ten practices to be consistent among the world’s very best.

 

In her book, Beyond Grit: Ten Powerful Practices to Gain the High-Performance Edge, Dr. Kamphoff explains why each of these practices is important to discovering your purpose, “owning your why,” and boosting your performance through drive and grit, which Dr. Kamphoff argues prove more important than talent.

 

Dr. Kamphoff is the Director and Founder of the Center of Sport and Performance Psychology, founder of the High Performance Mindset Podcast, a professor in Performance Psychology at Minnesota State University, and a longtime marathoner.

 

Today Dr. Kamphoff will share with us a little about those 10 practices, and how we can develop them to achieve stronger, more confident running.

 

Questions Dr. Kamphoff is asked:

4:01 What sparked your passion for running and how did that turn into a career in  Performance Psychology?

6:19 What inspired you to write your book Beyond Grit?

10:14 What are the 10 Practices you discuss in your book?

17:14 Which of the 10 Practices have you had to work on the most?

19:22 How can runners benefit from knowing their own strengths and weaknesses and how can they identify them?

24:02 Why is “Grit” more powerful than “Gift”?

28:04 How can people keep their ‘Why” centered in their lives?

33:26 How did your experience at the 2013 Boston Marathon reinforce your “Why” and how did it change your approach to coaching?

39:16 How does your Beyond Grit workshop help people gain confidence and push past  their comfort zone?

41:37 What else is in the works for you?

 

Quotes by Dr. Kamphoff:

“Grit really means staying passionate and persistent for your very long term goals.”

“Self-awareness is foundational to high performance, and it’s foundational to you being at your best consistently.”

“If you ‘think’ it, that’s not going to be as intentional, but if you ‘ink’ it, that’s really key.”

“I really like this quote by Simon [Sinek] - he said, ‘Working hard for something we don’t care about is called stress, but working hard for something we love is called passion.’”

 

Take a Listen on Your Next Run

Want more awesome interviews and advice? Subscribe to our iTunes channel

 

Mentioned in this podcast:

CindraKamphoff.com

Book: Beyond Grit

Angela Lee Duckworth TED Talk

Simon Sinek TED Talk

Get Beyond Grit Bonuses

Follow Dr. Kamphoff on Twitter

Follow Dr. Kamphoff on Facebook

 

Nov 8, 2017

Author, coach, and nutritionist Matt Fitzgerald started running at the age of eleven when he completed the last mile of the 1983 Boston Marathon with his father (who had run the whole thing) and his two brothers.

 

By that time Matt was already a writer (specifically a comedic poet), having declared his intention to pursue a career in writing at the ripe age of nine.

 

He never changed his mind.

 

An expert on all things running, Matt especially loves to write about the psychology of running and has written several books and articles on the subject, including his popular book How Bad Do You Want It? Mastering the Psychology of Mind Over Muscle.

 

In this episode, Matt discusses what goes into a runner’s mental capacity and shares with us some tips as to how we can better push our limits.

Nov 1, 2017

When you think of dietitians, you probably think of, well, diets.

 

It’s right there in the name, and most dietitians are devoted to helping people follow regulated diets that will, in theory, make them healthier.  

 

Heather Caplan isn’t like most dietitians.

 

The certified running coach and host of the RD Real Talk podcast believes diets are nothing but counterproductive and that “diet culture” is full of hidden agendas and falsehoods detrimental to our wellbeing and mentality towards food.

 

Not just that, but dieting can go way too far, causing conditions like orthorexia in which an unhealthy fixation on eating healthy can lead to symptoms like hair loss, difficulty sleeping, chronic fatigue, anemia, and hypothyroidism.

 

You read that right. Too much healthy eating can be unhealthy.

 

That’s why Heather exercises a non-diet approach at her private practice in Washington, DC, helping runners relearn the “intuitive” eating that diet culture can make so foreign to us.

 

In this episode, Heather discusses the pitfalls of diets, shares her firsthand account with orthorexia, and gives us some tips on how to adopt intuitive eating for optimal health and performance.

Nov 1, 2017

When you think of dietitians, you probably think of, well, diets.

 

It’s right there in the name, and most dietitians are devoted to helping people follow regulated diets that will, in theory, make them healthier.  

 

Heather Caplan isn’t like most dietitians.

 

The certified running coach and host of the RD Real Talk podcast believes diets are nothing but counterproductive and that “diet culture” is full of hidden agendas and falsehoods detrimental to our wellbeing and mentality towards food.

 

Not just that, but dieting can go way too far, causing conditions like orthorexia in which an unhealthy fixation on eating healthy can lead to symptoms like hair loss, difficulty sleeping, chronic fatigue, anemia, and hypothyroidism.

 

You read that right. Too much healthy eating can be unhealthy.

 

That’s why Heather exercises a non-diet approach at her private practice in Washington, DC, helping runners relearn the “intuitive” eating that diet culture can make so foreign to us.

 

In this episode, Heather discusses the pitfalls of diets, shares her firsthand account with orthorexia, and gives us some tips on how to adopt intuitive eating for optimal health and performance.

Oct 25, 2017

Running isn’t always forgiving.

Between injuries, mental ruts, and the curve balls life sometimes throws at us, finding long term success and remaining engaged in the sport can be incredibly difficult, and that’s why Jonathan Beverly’s new book is one every runner needs to read.

The book is called Run Strong, Stay Hungry, and it reveals the habits and mentalities of more than 50 veteran runners who are still running fast decades after they started.  

A writer for Runner’s World and lifetime runner himself, Jonathan will give us a peek into the lives of runners like Bill Rodgers, Deena Kastor, and Joan Benoit Samuelson to show us what it takes to avoid burnout and achieve longevity in the sport - both physically and mentally.

P.S. Jonathan was kind enough to offer two lucky winners a signed copy of Run Strong, Stay Hungry! If you’re interested, head on over to runnersconnect.net/giveaway. The contest will end at 12am EST November 2nd, 2017, so be sure to enter fast!

Oct 18, 2017

Now known as the “Acupuncturist for Skeptics”, Sarah Hammer Stevens wasn’t always a believer in this alternative therapy.

A longtime runner, Sarah was training for the Portland Marathon a few years ago when she sustained a knee injury that threatened to sideline her just weeks before the race.

Desperate to recover as quickly as possible, Sarah tried everything.

She consulted both her primary care doctor and an orthopedist but just wasn’t seeing any real improvement.

So, ready to try anything, Sarah decided to give acupuncture a shot, and she was glad she did.

After running pain-free to set a big PR, Sarah was excited to share the benefits of acupuncture with the world.

She quit her job to pursue a career in integrative health care, and she now enjoys helping runners like herself through her practice To the Point PDX in Portland, OR.

In this interview, Sarah will explain to us the intricacies of acupuncture, dispel the misconceptions that surround it, and share the reasons she believes every runner should give it a try.

Questions Sarah is asked:

4:09 Tell us about what you do and about your practice

5:13 What changed your mind about acupuncture and brought you into practicing?

8:40 How did you get into running?

10:59 How did the Hood to Coast Relays go for you?

11:51 How did the pop-up clinics go?

13:57 How often do you do these types of events?

14:52 What actually is acupuncture?

17:56 What are some of the funniest misconceptions you’ve encountered regarding acupuncture?

20:10 What’s the difference between dry needling and acupuncture?

23:32 How does acupuncture target problem areas?

25:27 How immediate are the effects of treatment?

27:44 What types of injuries are best treated with acupuncture?

29:21 Do chiropractors ever refer their patients to acupuncturists?

30:47 How has it been starting your own company?

33:01 Why do you think there haven’t been as many jobs for acupuncturists?

34:57 What’s the difference between acupuncture and Chinese medicine in general?

38:42 What exactly is cupping therapy and why do people use it?

41:08 Why is cupping so commonly done on athlete’s backs?

41:46 When do you advise people to get cupping therapy?

42:43 What does a general treatment course look like for an injured or sore runner?

44:28 How should people take the herbal supplements you recommend?

46:21 Who should use bone broth and when?

47:27 What’s next for you and your practice?

49:15 How can people outside of your location find a high quality acupuncturist in their area?

 

Quotes by Sarah:

“I went in, and I said, ‘I don’t believe this is gonna work. I don’t believe in holistic medicine. There’s no way that it can work, but I’m ready to try anything because I want to run this marathon.’ And lo and behold after the first treatment, my knee felt completely better.”

“You can read about [acupuncture], you can try to figure out how it works, but you have to just try it to really, really understand it.”

“People think [acupuncture] is a religion, and you have to believe in it and you have to be spiritual. And I’m like, ‘No. Absolutely not.’”

“We do mirror imaging: so we sometimes use the ankle to help the shoulder or we needle the ear to help the back.”

Oct 11, 2017

Okay, well at least occasionally :)

That’s what marathoner and writer Duncan Larkin argues in his book Run Simple: A Minimalist Approach to Fitness and Well-Being.

Duncan, who also writes for Outside Magazine, Competitor Magazine, Runner's World, ESPN, and Running Times, believes the best way to maximize running’s mental and physical benefits is to get back to the basics.

While the book is full of training regiments and advice for increasing quality over quantity, it starts off with one resounding message: ditch your gadgets.

According to Duncan, runners have become slaves to their electronic devices, and, believe it or not, this reliance can be detrimental to both performance and the very value of a training program.

In this interview, Duncan shares with us the principles of his simplistic training philosophy, a little about the coaches and runners who swear by it, as well as a sneak peek at his upcoming book, The 30-Minute Runner: Smart Training for Busy Beginners.

Oct 4, 2017

In 2009, Kelly Roberts was thrown into the deep end when she suddenly lost her younger brother, Scott.

Struggling to cope during this emotionally draining time, Kelly gained over 70 pounds by the end of the year, by which point she decided it was time for her to find a healthy way to work out her grief.

That’s when she found running.

8 years later, the sport has become invaluable to Kelly, and she now uses it to uplift thousands of others through her hilarious yet incredibly authentic blog Run, Selfie, Repeat.

Kelly continually strives to break the societal norms that insist what “strong” ought to look like, and she loves inspiring thousands of runners to pursue the best versions of themselves.

In this episode, Kelly shares with us what she’s learned through her own ongoing journey to self-acceptance as well as her tips to conquering the inhibitions that tie us down.

All, of course, with a healthy dose of hysterical laughter.

 

Questions Kelly is asked:

3:48 What prompted you to start running and what has that journey been like?

8:29 How has running impacted other aspects of your life?

10:24 What prompted you to start your ‘Hottie-Hunting’ selfies and how did that ignite your blog and fame on social media?

14:15 How has your blog evolved and where do you see it going in the next few years?

18:48 How quickly did #SportsBraSquad take off?

23:36 How has it been working with Oiselle and when did you start working with them?

28:39 Where do you think Oiselle is going to be in the next few years?

31:32 What challenges have you encountered with your running and how did you stay motivated?

35:18 What are you most proud of since you started this journey?

37:48 What would you tell a new runner who’s trying to break out of their comfort zone?

40:59 What would you say are some of the more common inhibitions that new runners may have?

43:11 Where do you see yourself as a runner in the next few years?

46:42 What can you tell us about the rebranding of your blog?

48:28 When will it launch?

 

Quotes by Kelly:

“Just because something is hard or just because something feels impossible doesn’t mean that you shouldn't try.”

“Being on a team makes you a stronger woman.”

“Running is about bringing people together and empowering them.”

“I think I can name on one hand the amount of people who actually know how to eat a healthy, balanced diet.”

“I really just want to run for life.”

“Running is something I DO, it’s not who I AM.”

“Whatever I can do to bring people together, I’m gonna try.”

 

Want more awesome interviews and advice? Subscribe to our iTunes channel

 

Mentioned in this podcast:

Run Selfie Repeat homepage

National Sports Bra Squad Day

girlsontherun.org

Oiselle homepage

 

We really hope you’ve enjoyed this episode of Run to the Top.

The best way you can show your support of the show is to share this podcast with your family and friends and share it on your Facebook, Twitter, or any other social media channel you use.

If more people who know about the podcast and download the episodes, it means I can reach out to and get through to the top running influencers, to bring them on and share their advice, which hopefully makes the show even more enjoyable for you!

Sep 27, 2017

One of the biggest advantages of running is that you don’t need a whole lot of equipment to do it.

 

But because we rely so heavily on the little equipment we do need, most of us would rather go for another run than try to choose between the wide array of activity trackers, GPS watches, and power meters available to us within the ever-growing sport tech market.

 

That’s where Ray Maker’s tech review blog, DC Rainmaker, can save you the time and energy not only picking the best product for you but also getting the absolute most out of that product.

 

A longtime runner and triathlete, Ray is arguably the most respected sport tech guru out there, and his climb to the top isn’t what you’d probably imagine.

 

During his spare time in high school, Ray started a one-man software company developing “programs” we now call apps - programs that garnered quite a lot of interest in Ray’s skills.

 

Long story short, Ray went directly from his high school graduation to a full-time career in technology consulting just 36 hours later.

 

Yeah. You might say he found his calling.

 

After 15 years working in the Fortune 500 world, Ray left his job at Microsoft to devote his time to a new passion: helping runners like himself optimize their performance by getting the most out of their gadgets.

 

From its honest product reviews to its exhaustive how-to guides, DC Rainmaker is an invaluable resource for runners everywhere, and Ray gives us an inside look in today’s episode.



Questions Ray is asked:

4:09 What prompted you to start running?

5:12 What difficulties did you experience on your way to your sub-3:00:00 marathon?

7:50 Are you training for anything right now?

9:21 What did you do before you began tech reviews and your blog?

10:35 How has your blog grown and evolved?

12:26 How does your local Parisian running community engage with you?

14:00 Are you recognized and stopped when you’re back home?

16:41 What does “DC Rainmaker” mean?

18:01 How much time do you devote to reviewing a product?

19:14 How can fitness trackers be used for running and which ones are the best?

21:28 Do you think there are discrepancies between different software platforms and, if so, why?

23:43 Why is there so much variability with accuracy, even with devices from the same manufacturer and what environmental conditions may pose challenges for accurate data capture?

26:38 Which Garmin do you believe has the highest Bang-For-Buck ratio?

28:43 How does Optical Heart Rate monitoring differ from traditional methods and is it more accurate?

31:01 How much weight do you assign to using heart rate for pace-setting?

33:06 What are some of the pros and cons of the Apple Sport Watch, Garmin and GPS Watches and what would you recommend overall?

37:04 What other tips can you share to get more accurate data from our devices?

38:51 How can we prolong the lives of our running watches?

40:04 What is your opinion on power meters and how do they differ from GPS watches?

43:24 Do you think running by power units will ultimately replace running by heart rate?

45:29 Are power and heart rate best used in conjunction with each other?

45:37 What is the most common question runners ask you on your website?

46:45 What’s next for DC Rainmaker?

 

Quotes by Ray:

“If you’ve got all your friends on Fitbit, then get a Fitbit device. If you’ve got all your friends on Garmin, then get a Garmin device - for activity tracking anyway.”

“For runners, you may want to use an activity tracker actually differently, which is to focus on recovery….because [fitness trackers] can hold you to kind of a limit, so say instead of trying to walk 10,000 steps today, I’m going to try to keep it below two or three thousand steps today.”

“How different watches have their antennas designed usually around the face of the watch or the base of the watch is without the question the biggest thing that will impact accuracy on that watch.”

“I’d say the biggest bang for your buck right now is probably the vivoactive HR or the new vivoactive 3 that was just announced.”

“I think like anything else, you want to keep doing new and innovative things. And so as different areas of the market place stagnate or kind of become the same, I’m going to find other areas to dig into - whether that be running power or running efficiency metrics or whatever it may be - I’m going to dig deeper into those areas and see what pops out of them.”

 

Want more awesome interviews and advice? Subscribe to our iTunes channel

 

Mentioned in this podcast:

DCRainmaker.com

Follow Ray on Twitter

Follow Ray on Instagram

MapMyRun

Garmin Connect

Strava

Stryd

Fitbit

Apple Watch Collection

Garmin Watch and Wearable Collection

La Parisienne Women’s Race

 

We really hope you’ve enjoyed this episode of Run to the Top!

The best way you can show your support for the show is to share this podcast with your family and friends on social media and leave a rating/review on iTunes.

This not only helps us reach more runners like yourself, but it also allows us to bring on more of the sport’s leading minds to make the podcast as helpful and entertaining as possible. If you have a couple minutes to do this we truly appreciate it!

 

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Thank you to RunnersConnect for supporting Run to the Top



 

Sep 20, 2017

Contrary to popular belief, losing or even maintaining weight while training for a marathon can be incredibly difficult.

Many marathoners either find they can’t quite achieve the weight loss they want, or, on the flipside, they’re able to lose weight, but at the cost of performance.

It’s a hard balance to strike, but with the latest research it’s becoming much easier.

The research in question revolves around the two concepts of Nutrition Periodization and Metabolic Efficiency Training. Together they increase the body's ability to use fat as fuel during exercise and thus optimize both body composition and performance. 

Joining us in this episode is Bob Seebohar, the creator of these two concepts.

Bob is a registered dietitian, exercise physiologist, NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist, USA Triathlon Level III Elite Coach. He also traveled to the 2008 Summer Olympic Games as a sport dietitian for the US Olympic Team and the personal sport dietitian/exercise physiologist for the Olympic Triathlon Team.

In this episode, Bob walks us through his findings on dietary efficiency and sheds some light on how best to achieve both the body composition and race day results you’re after.

Oh and for those wondering, here’s a breakdown of the “alphabet soup” behind Bob’s name:

 

M.S. - Bob has three college degrees. His undergraduate is in Exercise and Sport Science. His two graduate/Master's degrees are in Health and Exercise Science, and Food Science and Human Nutrition. He successfully defended two theses during his graduate studies and knows his way around interpreting research and aligning it with real-life applications.

 

R.D. - Registered Dietitian. A college degree studying food science and human nutrition is required to be able to sit for this national examination. Of course, this is after successfully completing a 9 - 12-month nutrition internship after graduation.

 

C.S.S.D. - Board Certified Specialist in Sports Dietetics. A certification only given to Registered Dietitians who have years of experience working with athletes. A rigorous national examination must be passed and frequent continuing education credits upheld to acquire and maintain this certification.

 

C.S.C.S. - Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist through the National Strength and Conditioning Association. Bob has worked as a trainer/strength coach since the mid 1990's and specializes in creating strength programs for endurance athletes.

 

M.E.T.S - Metabolic Efficiency Training Specialist. Bob explains this in his interview. :)

 

Questions Bob is asked:

5:06 Can you tell us about who you are and what you do?

7:45 What is Metabolic Efficiency Training and how does it relate to your concept of Nutrition Periodization?

11:50 How does Nutrition Periodization come into play with all the training variability runners experience?

14:34 How does Metabolic Efficiency Training work with runners who are trying to lose weight while increasing performance?

21:43 Why does eating become less intuitive to us over time?

24:40 How difficult is it for your athletes to change their nutrition philosophy?

27:45 How can runners adjust their macronutrient intake ratios to use fat as fuel more efficiently?

32:40 What is your opinion of Low-Fat, High-Carb and other ‘extreme’ diets?

39:01 Have you been able to get significant research yet into the role genetics plays with this?

40:39 Is the long-term goal to see where trends are and individualize athletes’ diets based on gender, genetics, etc.?

45:14 Has there been any research on Nutrition Periodization and how it relates to menstrual cycles and menopause?

47:06 What do you mean by the ‘Metabolic Efficiency Point’?

53:28 How would someone go about manipulating this efficiency point via nutrition?

56:54 Is it hard to do Metabolic Efficiency Training with Vegan, Vegetarian and Paleo diets?

1:00:50 Do you offer personal consultations?

 

Quotes by Bob:

“Even for the leanest of the lean marathon runner, these elites that are almost breaking the 2-hour barrier, they still have about 30,000 calories of fat in their body but we’re very limited in our carbohydrate stores.”

 

“Metabolic Efficiency Training is really looking at the opportunity to use the fat that we have stored already, preserve our very limited carbohydrate stores and do that by altering the daily nutrition plan.”

 

“Nutrition Periodization is simply combining the right type and amount of nutrition to support physical training. So when you’re going through the ebbs and flows of physical training (running), you go through ebbs and flows of nutritional support.”

 

“The best thing about Metabolic Efficiency Training is that it’s not a diet. The worst thing about it is that it’s not a diet.”

 

“When we’re young kids, we have this intuitive eating; we eat when we’re hungry, we stop when we’re not hungry. …The environment shapes us… into becoming less intuitive eaters and more either habitual eaters… or (more) emotional eaters.”

  

Take a Listen on Your Next Run

 

Want more awesome interviews and advice? Subscribe to our iTunes channel

 

Mentioned in this podcast:

Book: Nutrition Periodization for Athletes: Taking Traditional Sports Nutrition to the Next Level

Bob's Author page on Amazon.com

eNRG performance homepage

Bob's eNRG performance Coaching Page

Email Sinead

Sep 13, 2017

If you’ve ever been out running by yourself and felt a little unsafe, you’ve likely either had to change your route or cut the run short to head to a more secure environment.

 

This fear is one many runners know well, and that’s why runners David and Ellen Caren decided it was time to invent something that could offer peace of mind and keep runners safe.

 

Run Angel is the first personal safety wrist wearable that not only sends SMS messages and emails to loved ones in the event of an emergency, but it also emits a 120 decibel, high-pitched siren when activated to shock unsuspecting attackers and notify passersby of your whereabouts.

 

In this episode, David shares how the idea, company, and product were developed, as well as some additional safety tips all runners should keep in mind.

 

To get a Run Angel for you or a loved one, go to runangel.com and use coupon code RUNCON20 for 20% off your purchase.


Questions David is asked:

4:28 Can you tell us a little about your background? How did you first get into running?

6:05 How are the running venues in County Cork, Ireland?

8:45 What prompted you and your wife, Ellen, to launch Run Angel?

12:44 What’s it been like to start your own company and were there any hiccups along the way?

16:10 What was the prototype phase like for such a unique device?

20:20 How loud is 120 decibels?

22:11 What was / is the testing process like?

23:41 How does the silent alarm / Guardian Alert system work?

26:07 What sets Run Angel apart from other wearables on the market?

29:13 How is the device powered?

32:59 What other advice do you have for staying safe while running?

37:09 Is it not enough to simply be aware of your surroundings if you wear earphones when running?

39:19 How did you expand your market to the US through the Ignite Start-Up Program?

42:24 Is Run Angel available globally and how can people buy it?

45:21What is Run Angel working on now?

Quotes by David:

“No matter where you run, you still have that sense of vulnerability that something could happen or you could fall down or trip over something.”

“I was knocked to the ground by someone who wasn’t obviously out running, and instead of exchanging apologies and helping each other up, this guy just ran back in the direction he came from.”

“I remember having aspirations of bringing Run Angel out in 12 months and we were quickly told that you’d want to add 2-3 years onto that and we kind of snickered at that. But it did take that long.”

“When you’re dealing with a safety wearable, you’re dealing with a life element.”

“(Other wearable safety tech) isn’t notifying your attacker that you’ve just activated anything other than you’ve let nearest and dearest know that you’ve been attacked or had a fall.”

“Once we reached the threshold of 120 decibels, we went back and said, ‘OK, can we tune this frequency so that it will resonate in the human hearing zone?’”

“120 decibels is DISTRACTINGLY loud and that’s the goal. It is LOUD.”

“Each Run Angel is put into an acoustic chamber and it’s sound tested, so before it goes into a box we make a record of what the sound is.”

“There’s a few clever things you can do with Run Angel with or without the sound and a few remote activities you can do as well.”

“In the event of an attack, you have to know where your safety wearable is and the wrist is the first place you will invariably go to.”

Take a Listen on Your Next Run

Want more awesome interviews and advice? Subscribe to our iTunes channel

 

Mentioned in this podcast:

Run Angel website

Cork, Ireland

Safety Tips For Runners

Best Buy - Ignite Homepage

Best Buy  - Ignite for Vendors

Follow Run Angel on Twitter

Follow Run Angel on Facebook

Follow Run Angel on Instagram

Email Run Angel

 

We really hope you’ve enjoyed this episode of Run to the Top.

The best way you can show your support for the show is to share this podcast with your family and friends on Facebook, Twitter, or any other social media channel you use.

If more people know about the podcast and download the episodes, it means I can bring on more and more top running influencers, which hopefully makes the show even more enjoyable for you!

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Thank you to RunnersConnect for supporting Run to the Top

Go to runnersconnect.net/train to start your FREE two week trial today

 

Sep 6, 2017

We know that’s a sensational title, but hear us out.

A study published by RunRepeat.com, an independent review aggregator for running shoes, analyzed 34,680,750 race results over the course of 21 years to conclude that American runners are steadily getting slower across distances from the 5K up to the marathon.

We know what you’re probably thinking: with Olympians like Galen Rupp and Molly Huddle continually setting national records, how can that be?

While it’s clear US elites are steadily advancing, the study found that the remainder of the field is, on the whole, slower than it was in the 90s.

Now this could be due to a variety of reasons, and some argue one of those reasons might just be that the sport has gained a lot of popularity in the last couple decades.

More runners of varying age and gender? We like the sound of that.

While this is certainly plausible, others argue there’s another, less favorable culprit behind the trend: the rising rate of obesity in America.

This is the hypothesis behind the study in question led by Danish statistician, runner, and founder of RunRepeat.com Jens Jakob Andersen.

While Jens believes the correlation between slowing race times and the deteriorating health in America is too close to deny, he’s quick to remind us that correlation is not causation.

When it comes to statistics, Jens says it’s always easier to debunk something that’s not true rather than prove something that is, and that’s exactly what he aims to do in this episode.

Listen in and decide for yourself. Whichever way you end up leaning, you’re bound to learn something interesting about yourself and your fellow runner along the way.

Questions Jens is asked:

2:28 Tell us about yourself and how did you become passionate about running?

 

4:30 What prompted you to start RunRepeat and what does your day-to-day entail?

 

7:02 How is RunRepeat’s Run Score calculated?

 

11:23 How should runners go about choosing a shoe that’s really right for them?

 

12:32 What did you find in your study of American runners becoming slower and what do you think the implications are?

 

21:43 Could it be that there just aren’t as many Americans in the top 1% to compensate for the greater number of people towards the back of the pack?

 

23:38 What would it take for Americans to reverse this trend?

 

27:02 Where are some of these Blue Zones located?

 

27:41 In your study on marathon results, what were some of the key takeaways you saw and what did the study entail?

 

31:58 Why do you think there has been such an increase in female runners over 50 taking up running within the last decade ?

 

33:38 Why do you think men tend to go out faster than they probably should when racing?

 

35:38 Why do you think runners ages 35-45 make the best pacers?

 

37:02 Based on the studies you’ve done, what advice would you give us on tackling our next marathon?

 

39:42 What’s next with you at RunRepeat?



Quotes by Jens:

“It bothered me how 90 percent of people bought the same five pairs of running shoes, and I thought, ‘Why is this happening?’ It’s happening because these brands...promote specific models, and so there becomes a hype around specific models.”

“We looked at the finisher number (number 100, number 1,000, number 2,000, number 5,000) for each race distance, and what we found was that across this all were getting slower.”

“It’s always hard with statistics to come up with a clear cut conclusion. It’s always easier to debunk something that’s not the case.”

“Americans (as well as most other nations) are getting more and more obese, and their finish times are getting slower. But this is a correlation: two parameters that follow each other. It’s not necessarily a causation….So this is our hypothesis, but we cannot conclude it for sure with 100 percent certainty.”

Want more awesome interviews and advice? Subscribe to our iTunes channel

Mentioned in this podcast:

RunRepeat.com

RunRepeat Article: American Runners Have Never Been Slower (Mega Study)

RunRepeat Marathon Study

RunnersConnect Race Pace Calculator

NPR Article: Longevity Diet Tips From the Blue Zones

Follow Jens on Twitter

Send Jens an email



We really hope you’ve enjoyed this episode of Run to the Top.

The best way you can show your support of the show is to share this podcast with your family and friends and share it on your Facebook, Twitter, or any other social media channel you use.

If more people who know about the podcast and download the episodes, it means I can reach out to and get through to the top running influencers, to bring them on and share their advice, which hopefully makes the show even more enjoyable for you!

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Aug 30, 2017

When it comes to running, some days are great, some are mediocre, and some are, well, horrendous.

The same is true for runners of all skill level, and this volatility is not only what makes running one of the most mentally challenging sports out there but also one of the most rewarding.

If you know how to leap the mental barriers.

That’s why in this episode we’re speaking with runner, counselor, and sports psychology consultant Adrienne Langelier. 

A Woodlands, TX native, Adrienne combines her own athletic experience with a background in applied sports psychology to help runners hurdle the mental roadblocks so common in running.

Listen in as Adrienne shares her advice on how to strengthen your mind and overcome the mental blocks that might be holding you back.

Questions Adrienne is asked:

2:02 How did you first get into running and how did you decide to become a sports psychology consultant?

 

10:05 What do runners of all skill levels have in common when it comes to mental barriers?

 

13:57 How would advise runners set short, intermediate and long-term goals for themselves?

 

18:19 What is the difference between intrinsic and extrinsic motivation and what do they mean in terms of running?

 

19:51 How can extrinsically motivated runners stay driven once they achieve goals such as weight loss or set a PR?

 

22:37 How would you advise someone who is having negative thoughts going into a big race?

 

29:37 Do you use visualization with your clients and, if so, how?

 

32:33 How would you advise a runner who is experiencing difficulties or setbacks within a race?

 

36:28 How can runners not get swept up in a comparison trap to other runners?

 

43:03 How can runner’s improve their mental capacity?

 

Quotes by Adrienne:

“Yes we have limits - whether that’s genetics, environment, whatever it is - but a lot of runners tend to impose greater limits than that actually already exist.”

“One of the biggest obstacles that I see runners fall into is rigid goals.”

“Pick something that scares you, but it’s scary to where you want to run towards it. You want it to be challenging but not threatening to you.”

“Negative thinking has been shown in studies to increase muscle tension, which in turn affects our breathing negatively and affects our blood flow....If our body’s tight, our mind’s tight.”

“If there’s something like inputs in the environment or there are triggers that are driving the negative thinking, do your best to eliminate them if you have control over them.”

 

Want more awesome interviews and advice? Subscribe to our iTunes channel

 

Mentioned in this podcast:

Adrienne's Psychology Today Profile

Adrienne's Blog

Follow Adrienne on Twitter

Interview with Nick Symmonds

Book - A Life Without Limits: A World Champion's Journey by Chrissie Wellington

 

We really hope you’ve enjoyed this episode of Run to the Top.

The best way you can show your support of the show is to share this podcast with your family and friends and share it on your Facebook, Twitter, or any other social media channel you use.

If more people who know about the podcast and download the episodes, it means I can reach out to and get through to the top running influencers, to bring them on and share their advice, which hopefully makes the show even more enjoyable for you!

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Thank you to our sponsors for supporting Run to the Top 

 

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Aug 23, 2017

Our very own community manager at RunnersConnect, Tony Pallotta, recently joined the RunnersConnect team after owning and operating a specialty running store in Boston for twelve years.

Leaving one running mecca for another, Tony now lives in Denver, CO where he continues working as a personal coach as well as training for his next big ultramarathon.

He has raced everything from the 400 on the track all the way up to Ironman’s and has accumulated enough miles to circle the globe twice, including a double Grand Canyon crossing.

Tony has dedicated so much of his life to helping other runners meet their potential, and not only is he our community manager at RunnersConnect but he’s also a longtime member.

Listen in as Tony shares his insight, knowledge, and experience to break down some of the most pervasive misconceptions about injuries, shoes, and more.

Questions Tony is asked:

2:22 Tony’s background

3:38 What was it like transitioning from a RunnersConnect member to a RunnersConnect staff member?

4:28 What are you doing for RunnersConnect?

8:16 How can people send you there questions or interview requests?

9:50 Has the Chump been stumped?

13:04 What was your experience with runners looking for specific shoes based on marketing or word of mouth?

19:41 How can people self-assess their foot type?

27:23 What was it like owning a running store in Boston?

28:57 How often would a runner come into your store looking for a shoe that would fix their issues on it's own?

34:51 When are orthotics helpful to runners?

37:19 What are your thoughts on minimalist vs. maximalist shoes?

41:17 What’s ahead for you?

Quotes by Tony:

“It’s that sense of community that makes running an incredibly healthy sport, more than just by the definition of health.”

“I think when people think about their own ‘story,’, that it has to be some amazing, powerful story, but I tell people the details are different, among everyone’s stories, but the underlying theme is not.”

“Fixing injuries really comes down to the runner being able to answer questions.”

“You can have a best friend and wear Asics and they wear Nike, and your friendship will not be jeopardized. I promise. It’ll actually be stronger because you’ll both be able to run together.”

“Running does not define me as a person but makes my life whole. It keeps me focused, healthy and inspired to constantly challenge myself and explore the unknown.”

“Specialty run shops are still the heart and the soul of the running community in so many ways. If you’re struggling, you HAVE to go to your specialty run shop; they have a vested interest in fitting you properly.”

“If I tell people I’m going to run 50 miles… I don’t even tell them because they’re like, ‘What? I can’t even DRIVE 50 miles.’”

“When it comes to running advice: question everything.”

Take a Listen on Your Next Run

Want more awesome interviews and advice? Subscribe to our iTunes channel

 

Mentioned in this podcast:

RunnersConnect on Facebook

Send Tony an e-mail

Runner's World - What Foot Type Am I? (Self Test)

Interview with Dr. Irene Davis

USATF New England

 

We really hope you’ve enjoyed this episode of Run to the Top.

The best way you can show your support of the show is to share this podcast with your family and friends and share it on your Facebook, Twitter, or any other social media channel you use.

If more people who know about the podcast and download the episodes, it means I can reach out to and get through to the top running influencers, to bring them on and share their advice, which hopefully makes the show even more enjoyable for you!

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Thank you to our sponsors for supporting Run to the Top

Send an email to info@pacifichealthlabs.com with the subject line "Run to the Top" and ask for your FREE Accel Gel samples. Don't forget to include your address!



Aug 16, 2017

President of the International Association of Women Runners, Bennett Cohen is a renowned coach for women over 40 and has helped women into their late 70s reach new personal bests.

Plagued by his own nagging injuries, Bennett conducted research on how to train smarter and use strength training. As a result, he was able to get back into full training incredibly quickly, as you’ll hear, and he has been able to remain virtually injury free since.

He explains in detail the reasons why older runners in general, and women specifically, have different injury risks and training needs than younger runners and he also discusses strategies to help master runners of any experience level.

He’s been an avid runner for almost 40 years and a coach for 16 years, and in this episode he shares his valuable insight on how to tailor our training depending on our age and gender. And don’t worry - if you’re a man or woman under the age of 40 - there’s plenty for you in this interview as well.

 

Questions Bennett is asked:

2:07 How did you first get into running?

7:27 How did you transition from becoming a runner to being a coach?

9:57 What prompted you to co-found the International Association of Women Runners and what is its mission?

12:10 What sets women over 40 apart from younger women, or even men, regarding their training needs?

15:29 Do male master runners also have different needs than when they were younger?

17:17 How should older runners structure a week of training and entire race build ups for sufficient recovery?

22:13 Do you think older runners should be doing two full marathons per year?

24:46 Are there any particular injuries that older runners, especially women, are prone to?

26:01 What can runners do to prevent  these injuries?

27:20 Why do you think there has been so little research on post-menopausal female runners and do you anticipate an increase in research in the future?

31:15 How can women make changes to their training, diet and lifestyle to mitigate the symptoms of menopause on their running?

33:51 How can women structure their training to be in sync with their symptoms or cycles?

35:34 How can insomnia sufferers get the rest the need for training and recovery?

39:26 How about for avoiding weight gain during, or post, menopause?

42:17 Is it true that running economy or one’s ability to use oxygen at a given pace decreases with age?

47:19 Do you have any tips for longevity in the sport? Anything younger female and male runners can do to set themselves up for success later on?

50:35 Do you have any advice for those over 40 just getting into running?

52:42 What’s on tap for you next?

 

Quotes by Bennett:

“I’m not an elite runner now and I never was an elite runner.”

“Gradually my coaching practice migrated to primarily women runners and they began enjoying success regardless of age, experience, or natural talents.”

“My experience is that women runners over 40 are poorly served by generic running programs that neither age, nor gender, into account.”

“A marathon is twice the distance of a half-marathon in distance only. It’s not twice the effort, it’s not twice the focus; it’s more like 3-4 times the effort, the focus, the commitment and the sacrifice.”

“In North America the running movement is driven by women. There are far more women distance runners than male distance runners and there are more women masters runners still looking to improve and race their best.”

“If the symptoms associated with menopause are affecting your training, they’re also affecting your daily life, your overall well-being, your relationships, your job performance; it’s kind of like everything that you do.”

 

 

Take a Listen on Your Next Run

Want more awesome interviews and advice? Subscribe to our iTunes channel

 

Mentioned in this podcast:

International Association of Women Runners homepage

Run To The Top interview with Jenny Hadfield

Nancy Clark, MS, RD, CSSD - Sports Nutritionist

Strategy Session with Bennett

 

We really hope you’ve enjoyed this episode of Run to the Top.

The best way you can show your support of the show is to share this podcast with your family and friends and share it on your Facebook, Twitter, or any other social media channel you use.

If more people who know about the podcast and download the episodes, it means I can reach out to and get through to the top running influencers, to bring them on and share their advice, which hopefully makes the show even more enjoyable for you!

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Aug 9, 2017

Have you ever trained hard for a race, paid the entry and travel fees, only to have a bad experience because the race wasn’t what you expected?

Enter BibRave.

Tim Murphy and his wife Jessica are both avid runners who founded BibRave back in 2011 with the desire to separate the good races from the bad so runners wouldn’t have to take chances.

BibRave is an online running community that allows runners to research, recommend, and leave feedback on races.

This of course makes the website important to not only runners but to race coordinators and directors as well, and that’s why Tim and Jessica also help races improve and better promote themselves.

Whether you’re trying to figure out where to race next or maybe you’re thinking of conducting an event of your own, this episode’s for you.

And if you’re in the US (or you’ve raced in the US), be sure to nominate your favorite race for the BibRave 100 - a definitive list of the best races in America. Voting ends August 20, 2017.

 

Questions Tim is asked:

3:11 How did you first get into running?

5:45 How did you like Chicago as your first marathon?

6:39 What led you and Jessica to start the company back in 2011 and what was your mission?

9:42 What does your day-to-day work look like at BibRave?

12:51 When will the BibRave 100 results be published?

14:59 How does the BibRave community function - can runners simply leave reviews and tell other runners a little about their own race day experience?

17:00 What are some of the biggest mistakes you’ve seen people make when organizing an event?

19:28 What are some social media trends and how can people in the running industry take advantage of these trends?

22:07 What does BibRave offer for smaller events with limited resources?

25:57 Is a new brand featured on each BibChat?

27:02 Can you share any tips you have on how people can use social media to build themselves a brand?

31:22 How can race directors start educating themselves about social media and engagement with runners?

35:00 What tips do you have for how people can choose an event that is conducive to their goals?

37:25 What’s next for you and BibRave?

 

Quotes by Tim:

“The mission was to create a better place to learn about races, to further enable runners to talk to one another about what races are doing well and to create a more informed running community.”

“We have some power users that it’s just incredible how many races people do on a monthly and even sometimes on a weekly basis, and then are super diligent about contributing those reviews to help other runners decide what races to run.”

“I’m really sympathetic to the things races can and can’t control.”

“It’s so important for races to be overly communicative with their runners. It’s almost as important as where the cones go and where everybody lines up.”

“I always like to start when I’m talking with event directors or event producers by distinguishing the difference between digital marketing and social media, or social media marketing and social media engagement.”

“In any brand exercise, the most important thing is clarity of vision and mission. So knowing who you want to be and what you want to be right from the get-go.”

“If you’re a race director and you have really enthusiastic people who are signing up for your race every year, talk to them.”





Take a Listen on Your Next Run

Want more awesome interviews and advice? Subscribe to our iTunes channel

 

Mentioned in this podcast:

BibRave Website

The BibRave 100 Nomination Form - Vote Thru August 20, 2017

BibRave Pros

BibRave for Races

BibRave for Brands

The BibRave Podcast

BibChat on Twitter

Follow Tim on Twitter

Follow BibRave on Twitter

 

We really hope you’ve enjoyed this episode of Run to the Top.

The best way you can show your support of the show is to share this podcast with your family and friends and share it on your Facebook, Twitter, or any other social media channel you use.

If more people who know about the podcast and download the episodes, it means I can reach out to and get through to the top running influencers, to bring them on and share their advice, which hopefully makes the show even more enjoyable for you!

--

Thank you to our sponsor for supporting Run to the Top

 

 

Send an email to info@pacifichealthlabs.com with the subject line "Run to the Top" and ask for your FREE Accel Gel samples. Don't forget to include your address!

 

Aug 2, 2017

Sleep, stress, and dehydration can all raise or lower heart rate on any given day, which makes heart rate training less accurate than we’d like.

 

That’s why co-founder and lead engineer of Stryd Jamie Williamson decided it was time for a change.

 

With his business partner Li Shang and a team of like-minded “sports nuts”, Jamie set out to create the world’s first wearable power meter for running.

 

Stryd understands how fast you can run and how long you can run by measuring energy output three dimensionally.

 

Its unique environmental sensors measure your movements - including forward and back, side to side, and up and down - to determine how fast, how far, and how efficiently you can run across any terrain.

 

And that’s not even the best part.

 

It collects this data at lab grade power to give you real-time, actionable target numbers that let you know how efficiently you’re running and make reaching your goals a whole lot simpler.

 

Listen in as Jamie discusses how Stryd works and why power is quickly replacing heart rate training.

Questions Jamie is asked:

2:57 What prompted you to start Stryd and how has the process been so far?

7:39 How did you become interested in producing technology for runners and cyclists to train more efficiently?

9:49 How does Stryd differ from other devices like GPS watches?

13:52 What is ‘power’ as a unit of measurement?

21:07 What are the inherent issues with training by heart rate and how is Stryd more accurate?

26:37 What exactly is ‘critical power’ and how does it relate to lactate threshold and/or VO2 max?

27:49 Can someone simply determine their critical power from a 10k race?

29:25 Are other tests for critical power available on your website?

30:31 How does Stryd help runners with running efficiency, form and injury prevention?

34:19 When you're testing for inefficiencies with Stryd, do you get real-time feedback?

36:25 How compatible is Stryd with other technology?

39:37 Will Stryd ever be able to measure environmental factors such as wind?

41:50 What else is Stryd focusing on right now?

Quotes by GUEST:

“We have report after report after report of personal bests that people were getting where they were up against the wall and this technology allowed them to identify weaknesses that they could work on.”

“Computing real-time pace is extremely difficult...When you’re in a car and you use your GPS, you can actually use it as a speedometer, but that’s just because the signal is so huge. You’re changing large amounts of position over short amounts of time because you’re going fast in a car, and it’s the opposite when running.”

“Power is useful because it’s the only independent, objective measure of running performance,. It’s not impacted by any other things.”

“You start the race with a full battery - that’s how much energy you have to spend in that race. Given the duration of the race, at the very end you want the battery to be empty. You don’t want it to be negative, you don’t want to leave some stuff on the course where you still have some energy to spare….You want to have nothing left at the end, and power is the way to do that.”

“I will say a lot of people do use heart rate as kind of a safety measure. They’ll look at ‘What is my max heart rate that I want to stick to today and I don’t want to go above?’, and they’ll use it in that way to make sure they’re not overdoing it.”

 

Take a Listen on Your Next Run

 

Want more awesome interviews and advice? Subscribe to our iTunes channel

 

Mentioned in this podcast:

Stryd website

Stryd Facebook community

Follow Stryd on Twitter



We really hope you’ve enjoyed this episode of Run to the Top.

The best way you can show your support of the show is to share this podcast with your family and friends and share it on your Facebook, Twitter, or any other social media channel you use.

If more people who know about the podcast and download the episodes, it means I can reach out to and get through to the top running influencers, to bring them on and share their advice, which hopefully makes the show even more enjoyable for you!

--

Thank you to our sponsors for supporting Run to the Top

Enter to win a FREE 6-Pack of Perfect Amino from BodyHealth

 

 

Send an email to info@pacifichealthlabs.com with the subject line "Run to the Top" and ask for your FREE Accel Gel samples. Don't forget to include your address!



Jul 26, 2017

Ultrarunner, coach, and best-selling author Jenny Hadfield began running to

lose weight, but, as many people do, she quickly fell in love with it.

 

However, one thing about the running world Jenny didn’t love was the formulaic, one-size-fits-all training plans that didn’t accommodate for busy lives.

 

She began working with runners to create training that fit their unique makeup as well as their schedules outside running. She works to make running more accessible, and she’s a large part of the reason the sport has seen such a boom over the last 20 years.

 

In this episode, Jenny shares her experiences and philosophies to show us that there is a more practical approach to training - not only with our busy schedules but also with our bodies.

Questions Jenny is asked:

3:30 How did you first get into running?

6:14 When you first started did you see yourself doing all these extreme distance races?

8:10 What have been some races that you feel were defining moments in your career?

10:02 What were some of the difficulties you encountered along the way and how did you overcome them?

12:30 How do you use your experiences to help the athletes that you currently coach?

15:14 How exactly did you get into coaching?

17:57 What is the F.L.O.W.-based training system?

27:48 How do you coach your female athletes to train in sync with their menstrual cycles?

31:59 Do you think there will be more research on post-menopausal athletic performance?

33:41 At what point would you advise a woman to consult a physician for irregularities?

39:36 What is your nutritional philosophy that you use with your athletes?

43:19 Which calorie trackers would you recommend?

46:09 Are athletes hurt more by the quality or quantity of their fueling choices?

47:24 What’s a good in-race Marathon refueling strategy?

49:43 What advice do you have for beginning runners?

51:24 Can you tell us more about the color-coding system for tracking training?

53:36 What’s next for your own running and for your company?

55:36 Are your running vacations open to just anyone?

Quotes by Jenny:

“Running was always delivered in a form of punishment in team sports, so my association with running was painful and I didn’t like it.”

“Every race that we train for and finish can be a pivotal moment; there’s always a learning lesson that’s involved.”

“I learned early on that a template program is not going to work for everyone.”

“I believe injuries are an opportunity for growth.”

“I really needed to use my education in terms of fitness and exercise science and apply all those principles to a runner’s life, and really it was a mortal’s life and they wanted to run.”

“But what I saw (when GPS watches came out) were runners going from tuning into their bodies, listening to your breath to looking at a number and defining whether it was a good run or a bad run or a fantastic race or a failure based on what they saw on that watch.”

“There’s such a negative stigma about menstrual cycles and it’s one of the most powerful tools we have as women and once we embrace it and understand it and work with it, you will feel better because you’re now giving your body what it’s asking for.”

Take a Listen on Your Next Run

Want more awesome interviews and advice? Subscribe to our iTunes channel

Mentioned in this podcast:

Jenny's Coaching Website

 

Jenny's Running Vacations

 

Jenny's Podcast - The Coach Jenny Show

 

Book: Running For Mortals by Jenny Hadfield

 

Book: Marathoning For Mortals by Jenny Hadfield

 

RunnersConnect Extra Kick Podcast - Ep. 116 - Running After Menopause

 

My Fitness Pal

 

Training Peaks

 

Sufferfest Beer Company

 

Run To The Top Interview with Caitlin Landesberg of Sufferfest Beer Co.




We really hope you’ve enjoyed this episode of Run to the Top.

The best way you can show your support of the show is to share this podcast with your family and friends and share it on your Facebook, Twitter, or any other social media channel you use.

If more people who know about the podcast and download the episodes, it means I can reach out to and get through to the top running influencers, to bring them on and share their advice, which hopefully makes the show even more enjoyable for you!

--

Thank you to our sponsors for supporting Run to the Top

Enter to win a FREE 6-Pack of Perfect Amino from BodyHealth

 

Send an email to info@pacifichealthlabs.com with the subject line "Run to the Top" and ask for your FREE Accel Gel samples. Don't forget to include your address!



Jul 19, 2017

“Nick Symmonds” has long been a household name in the running world.

He is a two-time Olympian, six-time U.S. champion, the 2013 World Championship silver medalist, and the fourth-fastest American of all time in the 800 with a time of 1:42.95.

He’s one of America’s best track athletes ever, and, at the age of 33, he’s retiring.

Well, at least from the track.

Nick’s passion for running and his relentless desire to do more has him turning his sights to a new, slightly different challenge: the marathon.

Nick will toe the line at the Honolulu Marathon this December 10th, 2017, and he admits that he’s going to have quite a few barriers to overcome in the months ahead (barriers many of our listeners know too well).

Listen in as Nick reflects back on his incredible career, discusses his objectives for both the Honolulu Marathon and his company Run Gum, and shares his insight on the art of setting goals and working towards them.

 

P.S. Make sure you enter the RunAloha Sweepstakes for a chance to win an all-inclusive, 4-day trip to run with Nick Symmonds at the Honolulu Marathon!



Questions Nick is asked:

3:48 What would you say have been a couple of career defining moments for you in retrospect?

 

4:52 When you started running in High School, did you ever envision the career you had?

 

5:37 What about a low point and how did you get past that?

 

6:56 What led you to start Run Gum?

 

8:35 Had you been thinking about this type of product for a while before you started your own company?

 

10:15 How long does it take for Run Gum to deliver a caffeine peak?

 

11:28 What led you to decide to retire and has that decision been bittersweet?

 

12:48 Having retired from the track, but not from running, what made you choose to run a marathon?

 

14:45 What difficulties do you anticipate as you train for the marathon?

 

16:57 How have you used visualization in the past?

 

18:44 Can you tell us about the RunAloha Sweepstakes?

 

19:40 Can you tell us a little more about Run Gum?

23:18 How smoothly has the Run Gum company launched?

 

24:29 How has starting your own business impacted your decision to retire?

 

26:22 Why did you choose to sit out the 2015 World Championships?

 

28:51 Do you have any regrets about it?

 

30:06 Will you continue fighting for athlete’s rights in the years to come?

 

31:44 Do you anticipate Run Gum’s antitrust lawsuit against USATF and the USOC will be resolved in time for the next qualification trials?

 

35:50 How can listeners help facilitate improvement of athlete’s rights?

 

37:06 What has been your opinion of doping and cheating in the running world?

 

39:13 How did you continue to compete knowing you were running against runners who were likely doping?

 

42:31 What is your favorite flavor of Run Gum?

 

Quotes by GUEST:

“I didn’t love running; I actually hated it at the time, but I enjoyed practice, I enjoyed the team.”

 

“I wouldn’t necessarily advise athletes to start a brand or company while their still competing.”

 

“I’m going out on my terms. I’m not being forced out for financial reasons or due to injury, my body just doesn’t do what it used to do and that’s OK.”

 

“If you take the time to visualize every single scenario unfolding, then when you’re in the race and you only have a ¼ second to make a decision, you’ve already made it. You’ve already played that out in your mind.”

 

“I’m not saying that Run Gum is for everybody, but if you’re in need of energy and focus in a lightweight, affordable, easily consumed package this is for you.”

 

“As an athlete, you NEED to have an exit plan.”

 

Take a Listen on Your Next Run

 

Want more awesome interviews and advice? Subscribe to our iTunes channel

 

Mentioned in this podcast:

The RunAloha Sweepstakes

Rungum.com

The Honolulu Marathon

Nick's YouTube Vlog

NickSymmonds.com

Follow Nick on Twitter

Follow Nick on Instagram

Follow Run Gum on Twitter

Follow Run Gum on Instagram



We really hope you’ve enjoyed this episode of Run to the Top.

The best way you can show your support of the show is to share this podcast with your family and friends and share it on your Facebook, Twitter, or any other social media channel you use.

If more people who know about the podcast and download the episodes, it means I can reach out to and get through to the top running influencers, to bring them on and share their advice, which hopefully makes the show even more enjoyable for you!

--

Thank you to our sponsors for supporting Run to the Top

Enter to win a FREE 6-Pack of Perfect Amino from BodyHealth

 

 

Send an email to info@pacifichealthlabs.com with the subject line "Run to the Top" and ask for your FREE Accel Gel samples. Don't forget to include your address!



Jul 12, 2017

Closing the Gap Between Who We Are and Who We Can Be - With Adam Goucher & Tim Catalano

Adam Goucher & Tim Catalano met at the University of Colorado where they ran together under esteemed coach Mark Wetmore. It was there that a lasting friendship was born, and Tim and Adam later went on to pen a book on their combined experiences and studies.

The book is called Running the Edge, and it is as much about life as it is about running.

Running the Edge served as a philosophical foundation for their business, Run The Edge, a community of fitness and fun based in Boulder, Colorado. The ultimate goal of Run The Edge is to help people around the world improve their fitness and overall well-being, and to encourage all levels of transformation and growth through community support.

Adam and Tim are big believers in the power of reflection and self-awareness, and as they strive to help others better themselves in running and beyond, they’re continually working to do the same.

Take a listen and learn how the power of positive psychology can help us close the gap between who we are and who we can be.

 

Here are some of the topics we’ll discuss today:

 

  • Adam and Tim’s running background
  • Key principles in their book, Running the Edge
  • How successful running and successful living are intertwined
  • The importance of self awareness
  • Why having multiple sources of passion is important
  • How the challenge of running changes as we age

 

Questions Adam & Tim are asked:

3:56 How did you start running and what sparked your interest in it?

8:01 What inspired you to write your book Running the Edge?

10:53 What are some of the principles from the book?

12:47 How do these principles relate to your company and how did you come up with the name Run The Edge?

15:02 What are “The Six Mirrors”?

16:27 Did you have any learning or self-discovery moments as you wrote the book?

20:59 What is the dynamic like of being longtime friends and working together?

24:27 Did this dynamic exist between you back in college?

27:04 How do you advise people to find other passions without sacrificing their running?

31:30 What advice do you give to older runners, especially older beginners, who may be past their peak conditioning?

35:20 In your book, what do you mean by the Distance Maven and how did you come by that term?

40:29 What is your Amerithon Challenge?

44:55 Is there a time frame requirement for completing the challenge?

46:40 Can people join in any time after the launch?

47:34 Are most of your clients in America or overseas?

48:15 What’s in the future for Run The Edge?

 

Quotes by Adam & Tim:

“It’s weird how (running) can make you happy and miserable all at the same time.”

“We didn’t want to write a normal running book.”

“Am I applying myself to the point where I’m working as hard as I can and doing things the right way? Because if I am, then I will be successful.”

“Here’s what I really am. And here’s my ideal self, which is where I could be and try to look at the gap between those two things.”

“Awareness is the key. Once you are aware of your shortcomings, you have the ability to fix them.”

“You’ve gotta be more than a runner.”

“I’ll never be as fast as I once was, but that doesn’t mean I can’t challenge myself to do new and different things.”

 

Take a Listen on Your Next Run

Want more awesome interviews and advice? Subscribe to our iTunes channel

 

Mentioned in this podcast:

Interview with Caitlin Landesberg of Sufferfest Beer Company

Book: Running the Edge

runtheedge.com

Book: The Tipping Point by Malcolm Gladwell

Amerithon Challenge (use promo code: runnersconnect to save $5 off your purchase)



We really hope you’ve enjoyed this episode of Run to the Top.

The best way you can show your support of the show is to share this podcast with your family and friends and share it on your Facebook, Twitter, or any other social media channel you use.

If more people who know about the podcast and download the episodes, it means I can reach out to and get through to the top running influencers, to bring them on and share their advice, which hopefully makes the show even more enjoyable for you!

--

Thank you to our sponsors for supporting Run to the Top

Enter to win a FREE 6-Pack of Perfect Amino from BodyHealth

Send an email to info@pacifichealthlabs.com with the subject line "Run to the Top" and ask for your FREE Accel Gel samples. Don't forget to include your address!

Jul 12, 2017

Closing the Gap Between Who We Are and Who We Can Be - With Adam Goucher & Tim Catalano

Adam Goucher & Tim Catalano met at the University of Colorado where they ran together under esteemed coach Mark Wetmore. It was there that a lasting friendship was born, and Tim and Adam later went on to pen a book on their combined experiences and studies.

The book is called Running the Edge, and it is as much about life as it is about running.

Running the Edge served as a philosophical foundation for their business, Run The Edge, a community of fitness and fun based in Boulder, Colorado. The ultimate goal of Run The Edge is to help people around the world improve their fitness and overall well-being, and to encourage all levels of transformation and growth through community support.

Adam and Tim are big believers in the power of reflection and self-awareness, and as they strive to help others better themselves in running and beyond, they’re continually working to do the same.

Take a listen and learn how the power of positive psychology can help us close the gap between who we are and who we can be.

 

Here are some of the topics we’ll discuss today:

 

  • Adam and Tim’s running background
  • Key principles in their book, Running the Edge
  • How successful running and successful living are intertwined
  • The importance of self awareness
  • Why having multiple sources of passion is important
  • How the challenge of running changes as we age

 

Questions Adam & Tim are asked:

3:56 How did you start running and what sparked your interest in it?

8:01 What inspired you to write your book Running the Edge?

10:53 What are some of the principles from the book?

12:47 How do these principles relate to your company and how did you come up with the name Run The Edge?

15:02 What are “The Six Mirrors”?

16:27 Did you have any learning or self-discovery moments as you wrote the book?

20:59 What is the dynamic like of being longtime friends and working together?

24:27 Did this dynamic exist between you back in college?

27:04 How do you advise people to find other passions without sacrificing their running?

31:30 What advice do you give to older runners, especially older beginners, who may be past their peak conditioning?

35:20 In your book, what do you mean by the Distance Maven and how did you come by that term?

40:29 What is your Amerithon Challenge?

44:55 Is there a time frame requirement for completing the challenge?

46:40 Can people join in any time after the launch?

47:34 Are most of your clients in America or overseas?

48:15 What’s in the future for Run The Edge?

 

Quotes by Adam & Tim:

“It’s weird how (running) can make you happy and miserable all at the same time.”

“We didn’t want to write a normal running book.”

“Am I applying myself to the point where I’m working as hard as I can and doing things the right way? Because if I am, then I will be successful.”

“Here’s what I really am. And here’s my ideal self, which is where I could be and try to look at the gap between those two things.”

“Awareness is the key. Once you are aware of your shortcomings, you have the ability to fix them.”

“You’ve gotta be more than a runner.”

“I’ll never be as fast as I once was, but that doesn’t mean I can’t challenge myself to do new and different things.”

 

Take a Listen on Your Next Run

Want more awesome interviews and advice? Subscribe to our iTunes channel

 

Mentioned in this podcast:

Interview with Caitlin Landesberg of Sufferfest Beer Company

Book: Running the Edge

runtheedge.com

Book: The Tipping Point by Malcolm Gladwell

Amerithon Challenge (use promo code: runnersconnect to save $5 off your purchase)



We really hope you’ve enjoyed this episode of Run to the Top.

The best way you can show your support of the show is to share this podcast with your family and friends and share it on your Facebook, Twitter, or any other social media channel you use.

If more people who know about the podcast and download the episodes, it means I can reach out to and get through to the top running influencers, to bring them on and share their advice, which hopefully makes the show even more enjoyable for you!

--

Thank you to our sponsors for supporting Run to the Top

Enter to win a FREE 6-Pack of Perfect Amino from BodyHealth

Send an email to info@pacifichealthlabs.com with the subject line "Run to the Top" and ask for your FREE Accel Gel samples. Don't forget to include your address!

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