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Run to the Top Podcast | The Ultimate Guide to Running

Running podcast to motivate & help runners of every level run their best. Coach Claire Bartholic interviews athletes, coaches, scientists, psychologists, nutritionists, & everyday runners with inspiring stories.
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Run to the Top Podcast | The Ultimate Guide to Running
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Now displaying: November, 2017
Nov 29, 2017

Michael Hammond is a graduate of Virginia Tech where he competed in cross country and track, earning two ACC titles and four NCAA All-American honors. His individual efforts led his team to four ACC team championships: one in cross country, two in indoor track, and one in outdoor track.

On this episode, Michael shares his perspective on, well… perspective.

Most runners are goal-focused, which is understandable considering the time and effort that goes into distance running.

But at what point does this single-mindedness become unhealthy? How can runners strike a balance between their running goals and the rest of the world, especially when blindsided by an illness or injury?

In his role as Director of Coaching for RunnersConnect, Michael has gotten to know every member, their motivations and exactly what support they need to receive from the coaches as well as from each other.

In this episode, he’ll also share a little about the support we need to give ourselves.

 

Questions Michael is asked:

3:57 What do you do at RunnersConnect?

5:16  What are some of the biggest mistakes runners make when it comes to longevity and mental health in the sport?

8:46 How can overemphasizing one performance be counterproductive?

14:14 How can runners achieve and maintain a positive mindset?

18:55 What other outlets did you have to balance out running?

25:32 How did you cope with injuries and take your mind off running when you weren’t able to go for a run?

32:15 Why is the ‘comparison trap’ so detrimental for runners?

38:23 What other tips do you have for runners to keep perspective and achieve longevity in the sport?

47:13 What’s on tap for you now that you’re on hiatus from running?

Quotes by Michael:

“I think you should really be running for your own reasons and for yourself.”

“A huge part of staying positive is putting things in perspective from a LIFE standpoint, not just a running standpoint.”

“Injuries will show you what your real priorities are.”

“I think it’s best for 99% of runners to completely ignore professional runners.”

“Some of the most proud feelings I ever had were when I was by myself, completely alone, after a great race and I just felt that tremendous sense of pride and accomplishment; that is what you should be training for.”

“If you’re 50 years old, you can’t compare yourself to when you were 25; it’s not fair to yourself.”

 

We really hope you’ve enjoyed this episode of Run to the Top.

The best way you can show your support of the show is to share this podcast with your family and friends and share it on your Facebook, Twitter, or any other social media channel you use.

If more people who know about the podcast and download the episodes, it means I can reach out to and get through to the top running influencers, to bring them on and share their advice, which hopefully makes the show even more enjoyable for you!

Nov 22, 2017

Telling people that you run marathons usually prompts some dumbfounded expressions, but tell them you run ultras and, let’s face it, they’ll probably think you’re nuts. But that’s just a day in the life for Georgia native, Nathan Maxwell.

 

Like a lot of runners, Nathan started running to get in shape. He did a few 5K’s and then decided to try his hand at the half marathon. That was in 2012.

 

Since then, Nathan has completed 44 ultra marathons, 9 marathons, and 3 100 milers. He’s a self-proclaimed ultra junkie, and he loves sharing his adventures and promoting an active lifestyle on his blog and Twitter account under the name Social Shark.

 

On this episode, Nathan will share with us a little about his journey, how to transition from the marathon to ultras if you’re so inclined, and how to stoke the fire if you feel your passion for running starting to fizzle.

 

While running an ultra is no easy feat, it is manageable and possesses some surprisingly accessible entry points for those who want to dip their running toes in gently.

 

Questions Nathan is asked:

3:22 Can you tell us a little about yourself and what you do?

4:39 Where in South Carolina are you?

5:30 When and how did you get into running?

7:42 Was it love at first sight with ultra running?

10:33 How was the transition into ultra distance?

13:24 How do you train for ultras?

15:37 How do you avoid injury and fatigue with such a rigorous race schedule?

18:57 How can runners be more conscious of how to tune into what their body is telling them?

21:03 What advice do you have for runners who are struggling mentally with their training?

24:19 What advice would you give our listeners aspiring to transition from marathons to ultras?

29:00 How do you break down a 50-mile race in your head when considering race strategy?

34:27 How do you push past hitting the wall in a long race?

37:55 Your favorite mantra (which sits at the top of your website) is “When you walk, you won’t be held back; when you run, you won’t stumble” (Proverbs 4:12 NLT). Can you tell us a little about this and why this is significant to you?

39:53 How did you come by the name Social Shark?

41:42 What did you set out to accomplish with your blog?

43:46 What would you consider to be your proudest achievement to date?

46:13 How did the Uwharrie 100 Miler go?

49:33 What’s next? Any big races on the horizon?

 

Quotes by Nathan:

 

“My weekly mileage isn’t quite as high as even typical marathon runners.”

 

“I really listen to my body and make sure I’m doing the right thing.”

 

“You can set smaller goals (like) ‘I’m gonna run a certain amount of miles in the next 30 days’”

 

“You’re not gonna run the same pace in a half-marathon that you would in a marathon. Just do the same thing as you move up to some type of ultra distance. Expect that you’re going to run slower.”

 

“Find an ultra that’s out there that’s a 6-hour ultra. The nice thing about those events is that they’re very relaxed very chill.”

 

“Being able to be mentally prepared and ahead of time saying, ‘I’m going out and doing this thing.’ It would be so much harder if you were going out there to only run 20 miles and then you got to the 20 mile mark and somebody said, ‘Just kidding! We’re actually doing FORTY today.’ That’s where, mentally, you’re going to be completely devastated and not be able to get through it.”

 

 

Mentioned in this podcast:

Nathan Maxwell - Social Shark Homepage and Blog

P90X Fitness Program

Ultra signup website

Uwharrie 100 Miler

Nutcracker 12-hour ultra NC

Follow Nathan on Twitter

Follow Nathan on Instagram

Nov 15, 2017
  1. The world's best are gritty.
  2. The world's best are clear on their purpose.
  3. The world's best become a master of their thoughts.
  4. The world's best know themselves to master yourself.
  5. The world's best dominate the controllables.
  6. The world's best own the moment.
  7. The world's best choose empowering emotions.
  8. The world's best own who they are.
  9. The world's best live and let go.
  10. The world's best choose their courage zone.

 

In her more than sixteen years coaching elite runners, Olympians, championship teams, executives, and entrepreneurs, world renowned performance psychologist Dr. Cindra Kamphoff has discovered these ten practices to be consistent among the world’s very best.

 

In her book, Beyond Grit: Ten Powerful Practices to Gain the High-Performance Edge, Dr. Kamphoff explains why each of these practices is important to discovering your purpose, “owning your why,” and boosting your performance through drive and grit, which Dr. Kamphoff argues prove more important than talent.

 

Dr. Kamphoff is the Director and Founder of the Center of Sport and Performance Psychology, founder of the High Performance Mindset Podcast, a professor in Performance Psychology at Minnesota State University, and a longtime marathoner.

 

Today Dr. Kamphoff will share with us a little about those 10 practices, and how we can develop them to achieve stronger, more confident running.

 

Questions Dr. Kamphoff is asked:

4:01 What sparked your passion for running and how did that turn into a career in  Performance Psychology?

6:19 What inspired you to write your book Beyond Grit?

10:14 What are the 10 Practices you discuss in your book?

17:14 Which of the 10 Practices have you had to work on the most?

19:22 How can runners benefit from knowing their own strengths and weaknesses and how can they identify them?

24:02 Why is “Grit” more powerful than “Gift”?

28:04 How can people keep their ‘Why” centered in their lives?

33:26 How did your experience at the 2013 Boston Marathon reinforce your “Why” and how did it change your approach to coaching?

39:16 How does your Beyond Grit workshop help people gain confidence and push past  their comfort zone?

41:37 What else is in the works for you?

 

Quotes by Dr. Kamphoff:

“Grit really means staying passionate and persistent for your very long term goals.”

“Self-awareness is foundational to high performance, and it’s foundational to you being at your best consistently.”

“If you ‘think’ it, that’s not going to be as intentional, but if you ‘ink’ it, that’s really key.”

“I really like this quote by Simon [Sinek] - he said, ‘Working hard for something we don’t care about is called stress, but working hard for something we love is called passion.’”

 

Take a Listen on Your Next Run

Want more awesome interviews and advice? Subscribe to our iTunes channel

 

Mentioned in this podcast:

CindraKamphoff.com

Book: Beyond Grit

Angela Lee Duckworth TED Talk

Simon Sinek TED Talk

Get Beyond Grit Bonuses

Follow Dr. Kamphoff on Twitter

Follow Dr. Kamphoff on Facebook

 

Nov 8, 2017

Author, coach, and nutritionist Matt Fitzgerald started running at the age of eleven when he completed the last mile of the 1983 Boston Marathon with his father (who had run the whole thing) and his two brothers.

 

By that time Matt was already a writer (specifically a comedic poet), having declared his intention to pursue a career in writing at the ripe age of nine.

 

He never changed his mind.

 

An expert on all things running, Matt especially loves to write about the psychology of running and has written several books and articles on the subject, including his popular book How Bad Do You Want It? Mastering the Psychology of Mind Over Muscle.

 

In this episode, Matt discusses what goes into a runner’s mental capacity and shares with us some tips as to how we can better push our limits.

Nov 1, 2017

When you think of dietitians, you probably think of, well, diets.

 

It’s right there in the name, and most dietitians are devoted to helping people follow regulated diets that will, in theory, make them healthier.  

 

Heather Caplan isn’t like most dietitians.

 

The certified running coach and host of the RD Real Talk podcast believes diets are nothing but counterproductive and that “diet culture” is full of hidden agendas and falsehoods detrimental to our wellbeing and mentality towards food.

 

Not just that, but dieting can go way too far, causing conditions like orthorexia in which an unhealthy fixation on eating healthy can lead to symptoms like hair loss, difficulty sleeping, chronic fatigue, anemia, and hypothyroidism.

 

You read that right. Too much healthy eating can be unhealthy.

 

That’s why Heather exercises a non-diet approach at her private practice in Washington, DC, helping runners relearn the “intuitive” eating that diet culture can make so foreign to us.

 

In this episode, Heather discusses the pitfalls of diets, shares her firsthand account with orthorexia, and gives us some tips on how to adopt intuitive eating for optimal health and performance.

Nov 1, 2017

When you think of dietitians, you probably think of, well, diets.

 

It’s right there in the name, and most dietitians are devoted to helping people follow regulated diets that will, in theory, make them healthier.  

 

Heather Caplan isn’t like most dietitians.

 

The certified running coach and host of the RD Real Talk podcast believes diets are nothing but counterproductive and that “diet culture” is full of hidden agendas and falsehoods detrimental to our wellbeing and mentality towards food.

 

Not just that, but dieting can go way too far, causing conditions like orthorexia in which an unhealthy fixation on eating healthy can lead to symptoms like hair loss, difficulty sleeping, chronic fatigue, anemia, and hypothyroidism.

 

You read that right. Too much healthy eating can be unhealthy.

 

That’s why Heather exercises a non-diet approach at her private practice in Washington, DC, helping runners relearn the “intuitive” eating that diet culture can make so foreign to us.

 

In this episode, Heather discusses the pitfalls of diets, shares her firsthand account with orthorexia, and gives us some tips on how to adopt intuitive eating for optimal health and performance.

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