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Run to the Top Podcast | The Ultimate Guide to Running

Running podcast to motivate & help runners of every level run their best. Coach Claire Bartholic interviews athletes, coaches, scientists, psychologists, nutritionists, & everyday runners with inspiring stories.
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Run to the Top Podcast | The Ultimate Guide to Running
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Apr 3, 2020

In this week's update, Coach Michael gives details about what kind of strength training videos are added each day on our YouTube channel and also provides some clarifications on our upcoming virtual race. Listen now!

Apr 2, 2020

In this week's up-tempo talks, Coaches Ruairi and Dylan talk about the specs of the new Nike Alpha Fly shoe and how it differs from the previous models. Listen now!

Apr 1, 2020

Holly Zimmermann - Running Everest

In 2018, Holly Zimmermann was the first international female to finish the Mount Everest Marathon. That’s right; a marathon. On Mount Everest. Additionally, she has completed the 257-km (160 mile) Marathon des Sables across the Sahara Desert as well as a marathon at the Polar Circle. 

 

Born in Providence, RI, the middle child of three girls, she was active in team sports including soccer, softball, gymnastics, basketball, field hockey and even cross-country running (although she despised running then!) She received a Bachelor’s Degree in Mechanical Engineering with a concentration in Aerospace Engineering at Worcester Polytechnic Institute in 1991, then at The University of Rhode Island she acquired a Master’s Degree in Mechanical Engineering concentrating in the thermal sciences, and finally finished her education with a Master’s in Business Administration (MBA) at The College of William & Mary. She then worked for several years in research and development for military applications including antenna and radar jamming systems for tactical fighter aircraft (F14s, F15s) and later acoustic damping for submarines. 

In 2000, she moved to Germany with her Berlin-born husband with whom she has four children ranging in age from 12 to 18. With the birth of her first child, she gave up her technical pursuits and turned to sports and writing, while raising their children and working part-time at home as an editor for technical professional journals. 

Today she is an athlete in the world of extreme sports, from mountain and desert ultras, orienteering, endurance bike and expedition adventure races to running a marathon on the Arctic ice sheet. Aside from running, one of her passions is motivating others to be active, and she encourages them by speaking in companies, at sporting events, in women’s groups and at charities or by volunteering in schools where she trains kids to take part in local races. Her first book, Ultramarathon Mom: From the Sahara to the Arctic, was released in April 2018 and her second book Running Everest: Adventures at the Top of the World in April 2020.

Holly doesn't claim to have any better-than-average athletic ability but believes her passion for running and strong mental focus are what give her the drive and ability to compete and be competitive in long-distance races in extreme environments. Becoming a role model for other women has taken her by surprise, but she attributes it to being a regular woman that many can relate to, someone who does the cooking, cleaning and child rearing, but just happens to have an adventurous spirit that puts her physical and mental limits to the test.

Questions Holly is asked:

2:27 How is life in Germany for you now during the CV19 pandemic?

3:42 Are you still able to train?

4:08 Why did you want to do the Everest Marathon?

5:41 What was the terrain like compared to a traditional marathon?

8:03 What was training like for that?

8:59 Did everyone finish despite their altitude sickness?

9:55 What were some of the surprises that you didn’t expect on your trip?

11:33 Can you talk a little bit about how training for big adventures fits in with family life?

13:12 Does your husband run, too?

14:01 You've said that your strong mental focus is what gets you through races in extreme environments.  Can you talk about how to develop this?

15:43 How did your passion for running grow?

16:38 What advice would you give other parents who have young children at home that are searching for a passion of their own?

17:39 What advice would you give someone interested in running Everest?

18:17 Can anyone just sign up and run it?

18:50 What did you learn about the culture when you were there?

20:11 Are you a plant-based runner?

21:39 Did you notice a difference when you started adding in a little dairy?

22:28 What do you eat when you are in an ultra race?

23:51 Do you make your own oat milk?

24:07 What gear is essential for starting with ultra running?

25:20 What is next on the horizon for you?

26:24 What advice would you give yourself back when you started running?

27:21 What is the best gift running has given you?

29:44 How can people connect with you?

Quotes by Holly:

“There’s a lot of rocks, there’s some climbing, but that’s not the most difficult part because I run a lot of trail races here in the alps and they’re very similar in terms of the terrain, but what IS difficult is the oxygen. At the start of basecamp, we’re at 17,000 feet and you have about 50% of the oxygen as you do at sea level.”

 

“When you’re up there in the Khumbu Valley you see the rescue helicopters coming in and out all day long. And I think that’s not really heard so often in the western world, how dangerous it actually is and we witnessed quite a few visitors to the region who were evacuated. And it looked horrible.”

 

“I’m lucky enough to work from home, and that gives me the flexibility to spend some time training when my kids are at school. So usually I do that first thing in the morning and train nearly every day from between 1 and 4 hours.”

 

“A lot of it has to do with passion. If you don’t love what you’re doing, it’s hard to force yourself to do it.”

 

“If somebody else has done it and you have a desire and this drive there’s no reason that you can't’ do it yourself.”

 

Take a Listen on Your Next Run!

Want more awesome interviews and advice? Subscribe to our iTunes channel

 

Mentioned in this podcast: 

Run To The Top Winners Circle Facebook Community

RunnersConnect Facebook page

Mount Everest Marathon

Marathon des Sables

Book: Running Everest: Adventures at the Top of the World by Holly Zimmermann

Book: Ultramarathon Mom: From the Sahara to the Arctic by Holly Zimmermann

 

Follow Holly on:

Holly's Website

Facebook

Instagram

 

We really hope you’ve enjoyed this episode of Run to the Top. 

The best way you can show your support of the show is to share this podcast with your family and friends and share it on your Facebook, Twitter, or any other social media channel you use. 

If more people who know about the podcast and download the episodes, it means I can reach out to and get through to the top running influencers, to bring them on and share their advice, which hopefully makes the show even more enjoyable for you!

Mar 31, 2020

How accurate are the VO2 Max calculations on your GPS watch? What is the problem with the Garmin's race predictions? Coach Laura explains in today's Extrakick episode.

Mar 30, 2020

How to prepare for the mental and emotional rigors of race day during workouts and in your mind? Does visualization really work? If so, how can you implement it before and during the race? Coach Claire discusses seven mental strategies to build mental toughness during races in today's episode.

Mar 27, 2020

In this week's Team RC update, Coach Michael talks about our new weekday live at-home strength training sessions on Youtube and also give details on how you can participate in the virtual race, which is happening on April 19th. Tune in now!

Mar 26, 2020

Are you coming back from injury and want to get back to running? Where to start from there? How to return to action stronger? Coaches Dylan and Ruairi share various practical strategies that you can apply today for faster return. Listen now!

Mar 25, 2020

Carolee Belkin Walker is currently Chief of Staff in the office of the Special Presidential Envoy for Hostage Affairs at the U.S. Department of State. She’s a career professional at the Department with previous assignments as a congressional advisor in the Bureau of Legislative Affairs, the Deputy Director of the state.gov website, and a consular affairs officer and chief serving on crisis task forces such as the earthquake in Haiti and the earthquake and tsunami in Japan.

Since 2014, Carolee has enjoyed a successful side hustle as a freelance wellness and fitness writer for such publications as the Washington Post, Huffington Post, Women’s Running, and others. She’s the author of her memoir Getting My Bounce Back and she’s currently writing her second book, Keeping My Bounce in Spite of What I’m Facing. She started running in her late 50s in order to lose weight, but soon she began to embrace the overall health benefits of running, and most importantly the mental benefits.

As a marathon and triathlon finisher, Carolee is a proud member of the back of the pack. She maintains that participating in these events can play a major role in keeping fit and healthy as you age as they help you set good habits and teach you mindfulness skills that can have a positive impact on every aspect of your life. It has in hers.

 

Questions Carolee is asked:

 

2:42 How are things at the moment in Washington D.C. with all that’s going on?

4:23 How important is running right now?

6:20 We were first introduced when you interviewed me for an article in the Washington Post about slowing down your runs so you can eventually run faster.  Can you tell me what you learned overall from researching that article?

9:29 You started running later in life.  Can you tell me about why you started to run and how it's evolved?

11:50 Are people taking this situation as an opportunity to start or restart running?

15:12 You've written a book called "Getting My Bounce Back" and are currently working on "Keeping My Bounce."  Can you talk about the core messages in those books and how they relate to age and running?

20:47 What is the relationship between running and yoga?

26:24 What are the most important lessons you've learned about health, running, and aging?

30:29 How important is surrounding yourself with supportive people?

33:57 What advice would you give yourself back when you started running?

34:24 What is the best gift running has given you?

31:43 How can people connect with you?

Quotes by Carolee:

 

“When you’re running slow, you’re really developing the energy system that you need for the long haul. And the more you can develop that system, the better you can do overall.”

 

“Especially now with Covid-19, this is the perfect time to become part of an online running community or online training.”

 

“Doing some planks, maybe one plank on all sides, if possible; two sides and then in the center before you go for a runcan sort of activate your core which can hold you up a little higher so you’re not putting pressure on your back.”

 

“The fact is, even in a perfect situation… you might tweak something, but you don’t want to throw in the towel, so if I have a labral tear on my hip… then I will go swimming in the pool or I’ll do something else. There is no scenario where you should not be moving around.”

 

Take a Listen on Your Next Run!

Want more awesome interviews and advice? Subscribe to our iTunes channel

 

Mentioned in this podcast: 

Run To The Top Winners Circle Facebook Community

RunnersConnect Facebook page

Book: Getting My Bounce Back by Carolee Belkin Walker



Follow Carolee on:

 

www.caroleewalker.com

Instagram

Twitter

Facebook

LinkedIn








We really hope you’ve enjoyed this episode of Run to the Top.

The best way you can show your support of the show is to share this podcast with your family and friends and share it on your Facebook, Twitter, or any other social media channel you use.

The more people who know about the podcast and download the episodes, the more I can reach out to and get top running influencers, to bring them on and share their advice, which hopefully makes the show even more enjoyable for you!

Mar 24, 2020

In this challenging times, what areas you can focus now to make the most out of training? Coach Hayley explains in this podcast and also talks about the positives of having a period of time without racing. 

Mar 23, 2020

How much you'll slowdown when not able to run? What is the effect of detraining on your VO2 Max and fitness level? How quickly do you lose your running fitness? Coach Claire explains in this Audio Blog podcast.

Mar 20, 2020

In this episode, Coach Michael shares details about a virtual race that Team RunnersConnect is organizing next month. Listen now to know how you can take part in this event that helps you keep focused on your goals and maintain a positive mindset.

Mar 19, 2020

With many of us don't have races to do, what steps you can take to stay focused on your running and fitness goals? Why you need to reevaluate your purpose when it comes to running? How to be more productive when you've to work from home? Coaches Dylan and Ruairi share some great tips and ideas in today's podcast. Listen now!

Mar 18, 2020

Calum Neff- World Record Holder in Stroller Marathon and 10k

 

This week we talk with Calum Neff, who holds the Guinness world record in the marathon and the 10k while pushing a stroller, or as they say in the UK, while pushing a "pram."

 

Calum’s accomplishments are amazing and he has a unique perspective on getting fit as a family.   Currently residing in Houston, TX, he started running at four years old. His wife, Julie, and his three young daughters have helped define Calum’s running career after earning a series of Guinness World Records racing while pushing his daughters in the stroller. But he also is a diverse runner competing in all distances on all terrains in a single year, from speed on the track to grueling ultras in the mountains and everything in-between.  He also runs his own coaching business called Hardloop Endurance in Houston.

 

So just how fast do you have to run while pushing a young human in a stroller to earn a Guinness World Record?  Pretty darn fast! Calum ran 2:31 in the marathon, 1:11 in the half, and 31:43 in the 10k. That is lightning fast even without a stroller!

Not only is Calum fast, but he involves his family in his accomplishments, which is not easy to do.  You can tell that he takes his job as a parent and a husband very seriously, but also manages to have a great time in the process.

Take a listen as we learn about his training and racing endeavors. Perhaps you will be inspired to gear up the kid(s) and push yourself to new achievements.

Questions Calum is asked:

 

3:18 How did you get into racing with a stroller and how did you decide to go after stroller records?

4:30 Was it your idea or your daughter’s?

5:22 Can you recap your recent 10K WR you just got in February?

7:30 What tips do you have for stroller running?

8:43 What do you look for in a jogging stroller?

9:27 Do you switch hands and how often would you switch in a 5k?

9:47 What is your daughter doing during the race?

10:57 How would you describe your race footage?

11:38 What are the reactions of other racers to you?

12:28 Do you have stroller-specific training?

13:36 What tips do you have to stay fit as a family?

15:51 What strength training do you do with your kids?

19:15 Do you ever run without your kids?

20:02 What advice do you have for those looking at online running coaches?

21:34 Will you coach your daughters at some point?

22:24 What advice would you give parents who are looking for a coach for their kids?

24:28 How do you walk the line of nurturing and pushing?

26:45 Any more WR attempts on the horizon?

27:45 What are the differences between single and double strollers?

29:08 Any plans to reclaim the Half Marathon Stroller Record?

29:40 What advice would you give yourself back when you started running and weight training?

30:53 What is the best gift running has given you?

31:49 How can people connect with you?

Quotes by Calum:

 

“Running takes so long to develop. Stay consistent; stay at it through not only the good times, but the bad runs, as well.”

 

“Imagine you’re watching a movie and your kids are in that movie, but YOU’RE NOT. And you’re at the theater. You would never stand up in the theater and scream at the screen; you would never try to change the plot. Showing up to sports with that attitude is going to improve not only your kid’s enjoyment of the game, whatever that game is, but it will improve your relationship.”

 

“A lot of my work in the gym is just very light weight, but very focused on single-leg stability, because you’re either on your left or on your right when you’re running. It’s great to be in a single plane and strong that way, but as soon as you’re off kilter or getting fatigued late in the marathon, you really need to have those extra stability muscles and core strength to kick in.”

 

“Allie, when I did the marathon record, she was four. This is something that she’ll remember for the rest of her life and just to be running alongside Olympians was the coolest thing to share with her.”

 

“Stay fluid on the (stroler) bar. I always see parents with the double-handed death-grip on their stroller like it’s just going to fly away from them. It makes you whole body very rigid and your form goes out the window.”



Take a Listen on Your Next Run

 

Leave a space for libsyn link

 

Want more awesome interviews and advice? Subscribe to our iTunes channel

 

Mentioned in this podcast: 

Run To The Top Winners Circle Facebook Community

RunnersConnect Facebook page

Save 20% on your first order of Generation UCAN

Calum Neff World Record Half Marathon with Stroller Periscope Footage

Calum Neff World Record 10K with Stroller Footage

Thule Glide Stroller

Thule Double Glide

Thule Cross Trailer




Follow Calum on:

 

Instagram

Strava

Twitter

Facebook

Calum's coaching program



We really hope you’ve enjoyed this episode of Run to the Top.

The best way you can show your support of the show is to share this podcast with your family and friends and share it on your Facebook, Twitter, or any other social media channel you use.

The more people who know about the podcast and download the episodes, the more I can reach out to and get top running influencers, to bring them on and share their advice, which hopefully makes the show even more enjoyable for you!

Mar 17, 2020

How to strengthen your foot? What exercises can help stretch your foot and calf muscles? Coach Laura explains in today's podcast.

Mar 16, 2020

So your race is likely to get cancelled or postponed. Now what to do? In this week's audio blog, Coach Claire reads an article about how to potentially adjust your schedule for another race and why now is the best time to work on your weaknesses.

Mar 13, 2020

As many big-city races are getting cancelled due to Coronavirus, what can you do to remain positive and stay focused on other aspects of your running goals? Coach Michael gives suggestions on how to cope and turn this situation into a more positive one.

Mar 12, 2020

In this podcast about Olympic Trails recap, Coach Dylan talks about various interesting things that happened before, during and after the race. Listen now!

Mar 11, 2020

Sleepy glutes… yes, this is an actual thing for many runners. And it’s just one of an assortment of issues runners can suffer from. Whether it’s injury, weakness, or just inefficiency and injury prevention, a great physical therapist works individually with athletes to increase performance.

And that is exactly what PT Abby Douek, owner of and therapist at Run Raleigh Physical Therapy and Performance Lab, does with her athletes.

In this episode, we learn a lot about form; how to analyze it, including the differences between 2D and 3D gait analysis, and how to improve it.

Strength and conditioning is another crucial component to rehabbing and pre-habbing injuries. And the good news is that it doesn’t take nearly as much time as you might think to improve your functional strength.

Abby also challenges some conventional thinking about returning to running post-injury and thoroughly explains common issues runners have and some ways that might help them.

Lots of great info in this one, so you may want to flag it as a favorite to come back to.

Questions Abby is asked:

 

3:14 How was it seeing some of your athletes compete at the Olympic Trials in Atlanta?

3:43 How many of the runners had excellent form as you saw them running by?

4:12 How can people run well with what appears to be terrible form?

5:37 How easy is it to fix one’s form?

7:06 Can a novice runner fix form as easy as a veteran, or is it different?

8:18 What is gait analysis and what should someone expect?

10:16 Does form vary between paces?

11:02 What should people do if they feel injured on a run?

11:32 Should people run fast or slow when recovering from injury?

12:32 What are some of the most common issues you see with runners?

12:42 What are ‘Sleepy Butts’?

13:39 What can people do if they are deskbound at work?

15:02 What issues do you see with feet?

16:57 What do runners need for balance and how can they improve it?

18:18 How much strength work do runners need each week?

21:17 What is an example of a good strength work routine?

22:29 What are the best exercises for core?

23:09 What about ankles and how can we work on them?

24:25 What is the actual treatment process for injured runners?

26:49 How much pain is ok to run through?

28:38 Should most runners go to a PT when healthy or only when they’re hurt?

29:29 What advice would you give yourself back when you started running and weight training?

35:48 What is the best gift running has given you?

37:18 How can people connect with you?

Quotes by Abby:

 

“We are trying to prevent the pain before it starts. We’re trying to get out in the community, trying to talk to coaches, talk to run clubs, anybody who will listen on how to foam roll properly, how to do dynamic stretching vs. static stretching before you get out there, anything we can do to try to catch problems before they start.”

 

“Every patient has to do two what I would consider ‘successful runs’ before we can increase them. It can’t be a fluke.”

 

“I try not to tell people where to put their feet on the ground, but can we think about where your gaze is, where your trunk is, things that are a little more tangible.”

 

“People are really amazing compensators; people can run with all kinds of biomechanical issues. It’s not necessarily my job to fix what I’m seeing, but to work with what we have.”



Take a Listen on Your Next Run

Want more awesome interviews and advice? Subscribe to our iTunes channel

 

Mentioned in this podcast: 

Run To The Top Winners Circle Facebook Community

RunnersConnect Facebook page

Save 20% on your first order of Generation UCAN



Follow Abby on:

 

Run Raleigh PT homepage

Email Abby



We really hope you’ve enjoyed this episode of Run to the Top.

The best way you can show your support of the show is to share this podcast with your family and friends and share it on your Facebook, Twitter, or any other social media channel you use.

The more people who know about the podcast and download the episodes, the more I can reach out to and get top running influencers, to bring them on and share their advice, which hopefully makes the show even more enjoyable for you!

Mar 10, 2020

Can exercise alone prevent age-related bone loss? Do all kinds of running activities help build your bone mass? What can you do as a runner to protect your bone density? Coach Hayley explains in today's podcast episode.

Mar 9, 2020

How much will running in windy conditions is going to affect your race? Does running in the wind cool you quicker? In this RC audio blog, Coach Claire talks about different research studies on the relationship between wind resistance and running performance and also shares tips for tackling the windy races.

Mar 6, 2020

In this week's edition of the RC update, Coach Michael shares details about the "Athlete of the Week", an achievement made by one of our coaches and how runners can prepare for Coronavirus. Tune in Now!

Mar 5, 2020

In today's podcast, Coach Ruairi interviews Coach Dylan about his journey to the Olympic marathon trails. Find out how he qualified for the race, the roadblocks he faced, his training plans and his preparation strategy for this race course.

Mar 4, 2020

At RunnersConnect, we get a lot of questions about using pace groups in races.  While we teach about how you should run your own race, there is something undeniably beneficial about running with a group.  It's been proven that being a part of a group with the same goal lowers your own perception of effort which makes running hard feel easier.

 

And the idea of just blindly trusting a group and letting go of the mental math that you have to do when you pace yourself, is unbelievably tempting.

 

On the other hand, after months or even years of training, do you really want to risk your race by following strangers? 

 

So to answer this question, we sought out Rick Powell. Rick paced the last chance opportunity for women to qualify for the Olympic Trials in Houston this past January.

 

Rick Powell is a 31 year old Texan, originally from South Africa, a former marine and a current lawyer.  He has a personal best of 2:29 in the marathon and had the task of bringing in the group of women qualifying for the B standard under 2 hours and 45 minutes.

 

As you will hear in this interview, Rick is about as calm and collected as can be, which in my opinion is EXACTLY what you want in a pacer.  He talks not only about the specifics of pacing this important race in Houston, where he helped 17 women cross the line with an OTQ, but what pacing is like in general.  We go over strategy, what to ask your pacer before the race, and what pros and cons there are to pace groups.

 

If you've ever wondered about whether using a pace group can help you or hinder you, you'll have a better idea at the end of this episode.

 

Questions Rick is asked:

 

3:07 How did you end up pacing the 2:45 group of women at Houston, which was the last opportunity to qualify for the Olympic Trials?

5:17 What was it like on the day, and why don’t you like running Houston?

7:01 How was your buildup and training different from racing for yourself?

10:54 What pace strategy did you use in Houston?

12:38 What kind of questions did your pace group ask you before or during the race?

15:56 Were you running at a pace where you could communicate comfortably with them?

18:00 Is it acceptable to ask your pacer, “What’s your PR?”?

21:49 Should runners avoid pacers who are looking to positive-split a race?

23:38 Should runners audit the pacer with their own watches?

26:21 What was your finishing time?

27:24 Does Houston use gun-time or chip-time?

28:52 What are the pros and cons of pace groups?

33:21 What advice would you give for people who want to be a pacer?

35:39 Are you going to sign up again for this year?

37:28 What advice would you give yourself back when you started running?

35:48 What is the best gift running has given you?

37:18 How can people connect with you?

Quotes by Rick:

 

“Taking the pressure off of me doing well and putting it on, ‘well, I have to help these women get there time and I have a job to do.’ I didn’t have time to think how good or bad a day it was.”

 

“You don’t want a pacer who’s like, ‘well… I’ve never actually run that time before, but I’m gonna go for it.’”

 

“Important things to ask the pacer are: What is your plan? How will I find you? Have you run this course before?”

 

“If you’ve not run the course before, I don’t trust you. I’m sorry; I just don’t.”

 

“The pack CAN push the pacer, which is another thing to be concerned about.”

 

“The more people you get together in the same mind set, the same common goal, the easier it is. It’s that pack mentality where if you’re all working together, you all will thrive.”

 

“Having a pacer or being in a pace group is a good indicator of where you are. If you've talked to the pacer beforehand and you know their strategy and their pacing and you know more or less where they want to be at certain mile-markers, it’s a good red-line marker.”

 

Want more awesome interviews and advice? Subscribe to our iTunes channel

 

Mentioned in this podcast: 

Run To The Top Winners Circle Facebook Community

RunnersConnect Facebook page

Use Coupon Code: RTTT for 20% off Native Deodorant

The Pacer Who Led Last-Chance OTQ Hopefuls at Houston

Houston Marathon



Follow Rick on:

Instagram



We really hope you’ve enjoyed this episode of Run to the Top.

The best way you can show your support of the show is to share this podcast with your family and friends and share it on your Facebook, Twitter, or any other social media channel you use.

The more people who know about the podcast and download the episodes, the more I can reach out to and get top running influencers, to bring them on and share their advice, which hopefully makes the show even more enjoyable for you!

 

Mar 3, 2020

In today's podcast, Coach Laura discusses 3 simple things that you can add to your training to get the most out of yourself. Tune in now!

Mar 2, 2020

Are you a master runner? Is strength training necessary for you? How about speed work? Coach Claire clarifies and shares a few other tips to make running more pleasant for master runners. Listen now!

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