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Run to the Top Podcast | The Ultimate Guide to Running

Running podcast to motivate & help runners of every level run their best. Coach Claire Bartholic interviews athletes, coaches, scientists, psychologists, nutritionists, & everyday runners with inspiring stories.
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Run to the Top Podcast | The Ultimate Guide to Running
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Now displaying: Category: marathon
Oct 7, 2020

Were you one of the 30,000 people hoping to run the Boston Marathon this year? Are you hoping to run Boston next year? If yes, then you’ll want to listen to this episode with race director Dave McGillivray. 

This year marked the first time since the first Boston Marathon in 1897 that the race was held virtually and not in person. Ordinarily, registration for Boston would have happened in September, but as of right now, October 2020, registration has been indefinitely postponed. 

In this week’s interview, Coach Claire talks to Dave about how the virtual event went, how the Boston Athletic Association (BAA) has adapted due to the coronavirus, and what the future of the race might look like, including qualifications. 

Dave also shares what he believes to be the silver lining of the pandemic, as well as his own personal health scare story which he started sharing once he learned his experience could help others.

Dave has been the director of the Boston Marathon since 1988, but he also practically invented the concept of running for charity when he ran across the United States to raise money for the Jimmy Fund in 1978. He ran 3,452 miles from Medford, Oregon to Medford, Massachusetts over 80 days, averaging 45 miles per day. He ended his run in Fenway Park to a 32,000-person standing ovation. He has personally raised hundreds of thousands of dollars and has been a source of inspiration to countless others.

Dave has many other incredible athletic accomplishments under his belt as well. 1980 was a big year as he became the 30th person to complete a Hawaii Ironman Triathlon by finishing in 14th place. In subsequent years, he completed the event an additional eight times. That year, Dave also ran 1,250 miles of the East Coast, starting in Winter Haven, Florida and ending in Boston. He was joined by wheelchair marathon pioneer Bob Hall to raise money for the Jimmy Fund, and they met with President Carter at the White House during the Washington, D.C. leg.

And that wasn’t all for 1980. Dave also raised more than $10,000 for the handicapped in the Run For Our Dreams Marathon, running 120 miles in 24 hours through 31 communities in Southeastern Massachusetts, finishing in Foxboro Stadium (now Gillette Stadium) during a New England Patriots game halftime. 

In 1981, Dave raised $55,000 for the Jimmy Fund competing in an ultra triathlon which involved 1,522 combined miles of running, cycling, and swimming in six New England states. The race included running up and down Mt. Washington and swimming over seven miles from Martha’s Vineyard to Falmouth, Massachusetts where he was greeted by thousands on the beach.

As though running Boston wasn’t challenging enough, in 1982, Dave ran the marathon in 3:14 while blindfolded, accompanied by two guides, raising over $10,000 for the Carroll Center for the Blind in Newton, Massachusetts. 

In 1983, he swam for 24 consecutive hours, covering the distance of the Boston Marathon, to raise money for the Jimmy Fund. He also raised money for his alma mater, Merrimack College, by cycling over 1,000 miles through six New England states in 14 days. He raised more money for charity by cycling for 24 consecutive hours in a five-mile loop in Medford, Massachusetts for a total of 385 miles, while simultaneously directing the annual Bay State Triathlon which was taking place on the same course at the same time.

In 2004, Dave ran across the country a second time for TREK USA with nine other marathoners in relay style, raising over $300,000 for five children’s charities. In 2018, he accomplished the World Marathon Challenge, running seven marathons in seven days on seven continents.

To date Dave has run 158 marathons, including 48 consecutive Boston Marathons (32 of which were run at night after the official marathon.) His marathon personal best is 2:29:58. His Ironman personal best is 10:36:42. 

Fun note: Dave has run his birthday age each year since the age of 12. In recent years, he has both run and cycled the miles.

In addition to being a super athlete and philanthropist, Dave is also an entrepreneur, motivational speaker, and author.  He has been recognized with numerous honors and awards over the years for his achievements, and through his DMSE Sports and DMSE Foundation, he has raised over $50 million for charity.

 

Questions Dave is asked:

        

5:48 The Boston Marathon was held virtually this year, in September.  How did it go?  

 

7:49 I know the BAA discouraged people from running on the course this year, but many people unofficially did.  What is your reaction to that?

 

9:12 I would love to rewind a little bit and go back to February and March of this year. What were you and the team at the Boston Athletic Association talking about in the early days of COVID?  

 

11:29 Obviously throughout the summer you had to go virtual. What was that decision like?

 

13:05 As we record this, it is just before the London marathon, which shifted to an elites-only race. Was having an elites-only race an option for the Boston Marathon?

 

14:46 I don’t know how they’re keeping the spectators away in London. I just interviewed Jared Ward and he said, “I don’t know. I’m just showing up.” I don’t know how they’re keeping them away. I don’t know if you’ve had talks with them or no?

 

15:47 Looking forward to 2021, obviously there’s a lot of things up in the air. Usually in September, everyone is signing up for the next year’s Boston, and registration is to be determined. Can you shed any light on that and give us any hints?

 

19:01 How does next year’s Boston being up in the air affect qualifying? Usually you have an 18-month window of qualifying races, but obviously this year was totally different. Qualifying for the Boston Marathon is the Olympics for some people and it’s everything, and what they train for, and what they dreamed of for years, so how does that look from a qualification point of view?

 

20:34 And the virtual race, that’s not going to count for a qualification, correct?

 

20:43 If things do change and things are looking good for 2021, what kind of things have you learned from this year and how will it be different?

 

23:18 When you talk about potentially having a smaller field size next year, the first thing that obviously comes up means the faster runners would be qualified. Is that how you would shrink the field size, by increasing the times?

 

24:12 Boston isn’t the only race that you direct. You do direct some smaller races, and a smaller race, you have more flexibility to stagger the starts and things like that. Do you see some of the smaller races, Falmouth for example, coming back sooner than the major marathons?

 

26:49 On a personal note, every year after the end of the Boston Marathon you have a tradition of running the race yourself. Did you run on Patriots Day?

 

28:04 One thing that people might not know about you is that two years ago, you had open heart surgery, which is very uncommon considering you’ve been such a prolific runner for all your life. Could you talk a little bit about that?

 

32:07 What did your doctor say about running? Is running bad for your heart?

 

33:56 What kind of advice would you give someone who is training for Boston right now or that hopes to train for Boston?

 

35:06 Any silver linings from all of this craziness in 2020 that you can think of?



36:55 Questions I ask everyone:

 

  1. If you could go back and talk to yourself when you started running, what advice would you give?

 

  1. What is the greatest gift running has given you?

 

  1. Where can listeners connect with you?

 

 

Quotes by Dave:

 

“You had to reimagine. You had to start doing things that you don’t necessarily have a skill set in, whether it’s developing an app, or whether it’s developing a virtual expo. How do you do this?”

 

“We created a COVID committee of experienced scientists, epidemiologists, CDC folks, governmental folks, and put this group together to sort of help us come to some kind of intelligent conclusion as to truly what are we looking at here for next year’s Boston Marathon.”

 

“I learned a valuable lesson from my open heart surgery. Just because you’re fit doesn’t mean you’re healthy. And shame on me; I always thought it did.”

Take a Listen on Your Next Run

Want more awesome interviews and advice? Subscribe to our iTunes channel

Mentioned in this podcast: 

BAA - Boston Athletic Association

Runners Connect Winner's Circle Facebook Community

RunnersConnect Facebook page

claire@runnersconnect.net

DMSE Sports Foundation



Follow Dave on:

 

Facebook

Instagram

Twitter

 

We really hope you’ve enjoyed this episode of Run to the Top.

The best way you can show your support of the show is to share this podcast with your family and friends and share it on your Facebook, Twitter, or any other social media channel you use.

The more people who know about the podcast and download the episodes, the more I can reach out to and get top running influencers, to bring them on and share their advice, which hopefully makes the show even more enjoyable for you!

 

Dec 28, 2016

My guest today is statistics professor and humble Olympian Jared Ward.

He’s one of the best pacers in the world, and on today’s podcast we’re going to find out how we can start training to pace our races as perfectly as he does.

Jared wrote his Master’s thesis on pacing, and he’s sharing some of his insider information, tips, and tricks for how we can start managing our perfect pace.

One of his biggest pieces of advice is how he uses each running season to improve and learn new techniques.

As runners, we know that with every race we are testing our limits and learning something new about ourselves, and Jared’s got this learning down to a science.

So get excited!

Here are some of the topics we’ll discuss today:

  • The rewards of marathon training
  • Jared’s trick for getting into the zone
  • Jared’s thesis on how to have successful pacing
  • What it’s like to qualify for an Olympic team
  • How to run well in hotter temperatures

Questions Jared is asked:

3:15 What excites you about marathons?

4:10 Tell us about your success and your background as a runner

5:14 What’s your experience with running marathons?

8:23 What made you to decide to keep teaching instead of running full-time?

9:46 Can you handle the idea of just being a runner?

11:52 How has life changed for you as a running celebrity?

15:20 What inspired you to write your Master’s thesis on pacing?

18:08 What did you find out about successful pacing?

23:40 Do you have any pacing tips for runners?

27:35 Do you use a watch when running?

29:22 Do you ever have moments of doubt while running?

33:20 What do you tell yourself when you’re hurting while running?

36:35 How epic it did feel to cross the finish line at the Olympic qualifiers?

37:31 What was the Rio Marathon like?

40:09 Does your Olympic experience influence how you feel about your race abilities?

41:00 How did you train for your Olympic qualifier?

43:10 How can you run so well in the heat?

46:06 What’s your advice for high temperature runners?

48:30 What shoes do you train and race in?

51:00 Are you more or less sore after your races?

52:05 How do you manage to keep your family a priority?

55:05 What it’s like having a massage therapist for a wife?

55:42 What do you have planned for the future?

58:27 The Final Kick Round!

Quotes by Jared:

“I’ve mostly been blessed to never have a season in running that hasn’t been better than the season before.”

“I fell in love with the marathon before I raced it. I loved the training.”

“Trying to harness the trick of getting into the zone and racing so something magical can happen.”

“A marathon is more a race of me vs. me more than me vs. the people around me.”

“It’s more about maintaining a consistent metabolic rate than it is about maintaining a consistent pace.”

“Your body is always going to be your best gauge.”

“It’s just so critical to get in as much hydration as possible.”

“Never cash out long-term success for short-term success.”

Take a Listen on Your Next Run

Want more awesome interviews and advice? Subscribe to our iTunes channel

Links:

Jared Ward Running Co

Runners Connect Temperature and Pace Calculator

Saucony Type A (Jared's racing shoe) women's version (Use coupon code TINA for 10% off at Saucony.com)

Saucony Kinvara (Jared's training shoe) women's version

Saucony Zealot (Jared's training shoe) women's version

Saucony Triumph (Jared's shoe for tired/sore days) women's version

Saucony Life on the Run Men's clothing and Women's clothing

Jared on Twitter

Running with the Buffaloes by Chris Lear

We really hope you’ve enjoyed this episode of Run to the Top.

The best way you can show your support of the show is to share this podcast with your family and friends and share it on your Facebook, Twitter, or any other social media channel you use.

If more people who know about the podcast and download the episodes, it means I can reach out to and get through to the top running influencers, to bring them on and share their advice, which hopefully makes the show even more enjoyable for you!

--

Thank you to our sponsors for supporting Run to the Top

Enter to win a FREE 6-Pack of Perfect Amino from BodyHealth

Use coupon code TINA for 10% off at Saucony.com

 

Jun 24, 2015

The Chicago marathon: one of the 6 marathon majors that almost every marathon runner wants to complete during their running career. One of the fastest, and most recognized marathon races in the world, it is one to watch every year.

Last year, I was given the opportunity to race in it as an elite, and while in the elevator a few days before the race, I met the driving force behind it; race director Carey Pinkowski. Someone who had so much to do, and has so much responsibility, took the time to talk to a nervous, overwhelmed British woman, to reassure her that she did belong to be there. Carey has been the race director for the Chicago marathon [...]

Mar 4, 2015

Before today I was completely clueless on what being an ultra runner meant, other than you run more than a marathon. I can’t even imagine running 27.2 miles, but these ultra runners are TOUGH, my guest today talks about the popularity of ultra running has risen, and how there are not only 100 mile races, but 200 mile races cropping up. WOW!

I am excited to be joined by another podcast host today, one who I love to listen to, and learn from; Eric Schranz. 

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